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[Prevous page - Timelines For 1910-1920] [You are now on Merchants Networks Project Pathways2 page filed to list Convict Contractors to Australia 1784-1865 pathways1.htm] [Back to the beginning Timelines 1350-1450]

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Pathways to the Convict Contractors to Australia

(And to many of their associates)

Labyrinth

Dan Byrnes´ three print-published articles on the convict contractors are:

Dan Byrnes, '"Emptying The Hulks": Duncan Campbell and the First Three Fleets to Australia’, The Push From The Bush: A Bulletin of Social History, No. 24, April, 1987., pp. 2-23.

Dan Byrnes, 'Outlooks for the English South Whale Fishery, 1782-1800, and the "great Botany Bay debate"', The Great Circle, Vol. 10, No. 2, October 1988., pp. 79-102.

Dan Byrnes, 'The Blackheath Connection: London Local History and the Settlement at New South Wales, 1786-1806', The Push, A Journal of Early Australian Social History, No. 28, 1990., pp. 50-98.

Labyrinth

Continuation from file pathways1.htm

Year 1816

5 January 1816: To Thomas Barrick (his first contract). Convict transport Atlas. Shelton´s Accounts No. 53.

Thomas Barrick

Pathway to convict contractor Thomas Barrick active 1816 - Little information so far. This name remains a problem person for research by October 2012. Available clues are not helpful. Was he a shibuilder of Bagdale? Was he of Whitby, a master Mariner maybe with sons George and Robert? (See Byrnes, The Blackheath Connection, p. 97 and re Shelton's Contracts.) We find a Henry Barricks (sic) born in 1731 and one 1757 in Whitby. One Thomas Barrick maybe started the family in 1701, born in Whitby. Rachel Postgate (1817-1894) married a Henry Barrick in Whitby. The Barrick shipyard was not started till maybe 1812. There is a bankruptcy notice for George and Henry Barrick, shipbuilders of Whitby of 1866. (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

24 May 1816: To Aaron Chapman (his first contract). Convict transport Mariner. Shelton´s Accounts No. 54.

25 May 1816: To Walter Buchanan (firm´s sixth contract). Convict transport Elizabeth. Shelton´s Accounts No. 55.

12 August 1816: To John Robertson Bell (his second contract). Convict transport Lord Melville. Shelton´s Accounts No. 56.

2 October 1816: To John Robertson Bell (his third contract). Convict transport Fame. Shelton´s Accounts No. 57.

2 October 1816: To John Nichols (his first contract). Convict transport Sir William Bensley. Shelton´s Accounts No. 58.

29 November 1816: To Thomas Ward (his first contract). Convict transport Morley. Shelton´s Accounts No. 59.

Thomas Ward

This file remains Work-in-Progress

Ward, owner of convict transport Navarino of 1840, 463 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 13 August 1840, 180 female convicts and 12 children. Sailed 8 October 1840, arrived 17 January 1841.

Ward, owner of convict transport Susan of 1842, 572 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 23 February 1842, 300 male convicts. Sailed 24 April 1842, arrived 24 July 1842.

Ward, owner of convict transport Moffatt of 1842, 821 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 14 June 1842, 389 male convicts. Sailed 14 August 1842, arrived 28 November 1842.

Ward, owner of convict transport Navarino of 1842, 403 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 21 July 1842, 180 male convicts. Sailed 22 September 1842, arrived 10 January 1843.

Ward, owner of convict transport Equestrian of 1843, 659 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 11 December 1843, 290 male convicts. Sailed 28 January 1843, arrived 2 May 1843.

Ward, owner of convict transport Lord Auckland of 1844, 516 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 21 May 1844, 238 male convicts. Sailed 16 July 1844, arrived 15 November 1844.

Ward, owner of convict transport Theresa of 1845, 495 tons, brokered by T. Ward. Commenced 23 May 1845, 300 male convicts. Sailed 3 July 1845, arrived 15 October 1845.

T. Ward, owner of convict transport Lloyds of 1845, 495 tons, brokered by T. Ward. Commenced 24 June 1845, 170 female convicts and 30 children. Sailed 26 July 1845, arrived 7 November 1845.

T. Ward, owner of convict transport Ratcliff of 1845, 600 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 27 March 1845, 215 male convicts and two children. Sailed 12 June 1845, arrived 16 September.

T. Ward, owner of convict transport Lord Auckland of 1846, 516 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 2 March 1846, 180 male convicts. Sailed 19 April, 1846, arrived not reported. (Final account not received.)

Convict Contractor Thomas Ward, Wharfinger of Ratcliffe. He possibly had a brother William, as Oxley once dealt with Thomas and William Ward in London. (See Broeze on Brooks, pp. 62ff.) See AGE Jones on Daniel Bennett, whaler. Re the ship Mangles, from a website based on Bateson, we find that her slowest passages were made in 1822, under Captain Cogill/Coghill, and in 1840, under Captain Carr. On the first, she called at Rio, from which port she recorded a passage of 68 days to Port Jackson, which was rather better than average. In 1840 she put into the Cape, presumably because of an outbreak of scurvy among her prisoners, and her passage of 57 days from the Cape to Port Jackson was only fair. By then, however, her bottom was probably foul, and she was nearing the end of her long career. Carr died in 1841, and the Mangles passed into the ownership of the Ratcliffe shipowner, Thomas Ward. He transferred her to a Kingston-upon-Hull shipbuilder, Thomas Humphrey the elder, the following year, and when the latter went bankrupt the same year, the Mangles passed into the hands of a firm of Hull bankers, Pease and Liddells, in 1845. She was broken up that year.

From a website, RobertsofRatcliffe: blogspot.com.au, by Anon (seems to be in German, or to receive comments in German)-
Did George Charles work for the mast-maker and ship-builder Thomas Ward ? In July 1827 George Charles Roberts took out an insurance policy with the Sun Fire Office to protect his household belongings.The address given was 15 Bridge House Place, Newington Causeway and it says the other occupier was a sawmaker. In May 1828(also 1836)at the same address are Thomas Ward and his partner John Milner,who were mast-makers and ships chandlers mainly based at Cock Hill, Ratcliffe). On the 1830 Greenwood Map of London, I can see a Timber Yard at Bridge House Place, did that yard belong to Thomas Ward and was that where his masts were actually made ? ie., the saw-maker probably came in handy ... Did George Charles work for Thomas Ward after his apprenticeship? What is interesting is that John Roberts (1784-1860) was connected to Thomas Ward because they were trustees of the Commercial Road Trust. Were the Roberts connected to Thomas Ward? I have been trying to find out more about Thomas Ward because if it is the same man, (which I am not 100 per cent sure), he became quite an important ship builder, responsible for building many of the convict ships that were used, for instance to send convicts to Western Australia (where I was born !). It has proved difficult though, unfortunately no-one seems to have written much about him - I am hoping some-one will be able to tell me more about him .... He seems to have been born around the time of my John Roberts (1773-1847) probably 1772. I think he might have been the son of Luke Ward, who was also a ship-builder at Wapping. He was apprenticed to John Camper, a shipwright in 1790. In 1803 he became a member of the Lloyd's Society (ie. shipbuilders society). He married Ann Elizabeth Middleton at St. Anne's, Limehouse in 1820 and had only one child that I can see, Elizabeth Middleton Ward, who married very well later to the Lane family and is mentioned in Debrett's. Thomas Ward became a JP in 1828 and ended his days at Heath House on Commercial Road. He died in 1847 and was buried (appropriately) at St. Dunstans, Stepney.

John F. Morley

Pathway to convict contractor John F. Morley active 1820 - little information so far. (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

9 December 1816: To George Lyall (his first contract). Convict transport Shipley. Shelton´s Accounts No. 60.

George Lyall

Lyall, owner of convict transport Mayda, 485 tons of 1845. Brokered by Lyall. Commenced 15 July, for 199 male convicts, sailed 29 August, arrived 8 January 1846.

Lyall, owner of convict transport Pestonjee Bomanjee, 485 tons of 1845. Brokered by Lyall. Commenced 6 August, for 299 male convicts, sailed 10 September, arrived 30 December 1845.

In 1825 Marquis Hastings owned by George Lyall. (In 1830, the British government made an examination of ships let from 1811 to the service of the East India Co. Amongst the shipowner and ship names listed, some are noted as ships carrying convicts to Australia. Follows an extraction from the list, which is on a webpage provided by www.british-history.ac.uk - an aspx-generated report.)

This file remains Work-in-Progress

London: Pathway to George Lyall (1779-d.1853), born at Newcastle-on-Tyne, married Margaret Ann Edwards, said to be a City heiress (with no parents listed?). They had either three children or two sons and two daughters. A convict contractor, He made a fortune from government contracts during the Napoleonic wars. Sometime of 7 Royal Exchange, London. George Lyall was a director then a Governor of EICo, Gov. 1841-1843 and 1844-1846. In the 1820s he was chairman of the Shipowners' Society. A politician and merchant/shipowner, from 1805 head of a family firm of shippers in the East India trade. Member NSW and VDL Land Commercial Assoc. (the latter being semi-secret as a website puts it), part of the New Zealand Company from 1835, Australian Agricultural Company and London Emigration Committee. Lyall was of 17 Regent's Park, London, and Nutwood Lodge, Sussex. A director of the London Docks, chairman of the Indemnity Assurance Co. His son was: George II Lyall. George I Lyall was sometime of 17 Park Crescent, Regent's Park, London, Hedley House at Epsom, Surrey. Many years MP for London. A director of the Bank of England, a magistrate for Surrey. A Commissioner of Lieutenancy of London. He was a member of the Political Economy Club. He was chairman of Shipowner's Society 1823-1825. He had a colleague George Palmer (1772-1853) to try to reform Lloyd's as it was inefficient and corrupt. He and Palmer in 1833 founded The General London Ship Owners' Society. Some members of London Dock Co. were George Lyall, Mr King Jnr., Robert Brooks, Stephen Cave, Claud Stephen Hunter, Edward William Hamilton and Beeston Long Jnr. (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

Year 1817

8 April 1817: To Walter Buchanan (firm´s seventh contract). Convict transport Lord Eldon. Shelton´s Accounts No. 61.

21 April 1817: To Matthew Boyd (associates unknown, his first contract). Convict transport Almorah. Shelton´s Accounts No. 62.

Matthew Boyd

Pathway to convict contractor Matthew Boyd (born 1810-1813) - More to come (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

21 June 1817: To Joseph Lachlan (who had first taken such a contract by 1814). Convict transport Friendship. Shelton´s Accounts No. 63.

17 July 1817: To Charles Enderby (fourth contract for Enderbys). Convict transport Larkins. Shelton´s Accounts No. 64.

11 August 1817: To Joseph Lachlan (his third contract). Convict transport Ocean. Shelton´s Accounts No. 65.

20 October 1817: To Walter Buchanan (firm´s eighth contract). Convict transport Batavia. Shelton´s Accounts No. 66.

8 December 1817: To John Robertson. [John Robertson Bell?]. Convict transport Neptune. Shelton´s Accounts No. 67.

13 December 1817: To John Robertson [John Robertson Bell?] (his fourth contract). Convict transport Lady Castlereagh. Shelton´s Accounts No. 68.

Year 1818

John Robertson Bell

Pathway to convict contractor John Robertson Bell - active 1818. Little information so far and remains a research problem person. A ship and insurance broker, dealer and chapman, Bankrupt (in London Gazette) with William Wilkinson of Old Broad Street, nd. (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

William Wilkinson

On William Wilkinson. Still a problem person for research by October 2012.

2 January 1818: To John Robertson [John Robertson Bell? his fifth contract]. Convict transport Tottenham. Shelton´s Accounts No. 69.

2 January 1818: To David Charles Guthrie (his first contract). Convict transport Isabella. Shelton´s Accounts No. 70.

David Charles Guthrie

This file remains Work-in-Progress

David Charles Guthrie. Guthrie seems to have been a connection of the Mangles family, who wee also involved in convict contracting and incidentally related to the Stirling family producing the fist governor of Western Australia. Perhaps Guthrie´s limited involvement in convict contracting rose out of some arrangements with Mangles business interests?

James Mangles

Wapping: Pathway to convict contractor James Mangles (c.1761-1837/1838). More to come. For so far minimal information see Dan Byrnes´s production, The Blackheath Connection. (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

By 1 May 1815 (soon after a different partnerships of Mangles names had dissolved by mutual consent), one John Fulham Turner, a ships chandler of Book by Morris and Cozens on Wapping, was a new partner with James Mangles, Robert Mangles, Edward A. Mangles and Frederick Mangles. This John Fulham Turner had a daughter Jane married to a convict ships captain and small-time convict contractor, Mangnus Johnson.

Wapping: Magnus Johnson. Contractor. An e-mail from Ann Sadler of 8-2-2006 suggested he was maybe lost at sea by 1832. Had been Master of convict ship Guildford. He was not exactly lost off the Guildford, his ship had dropped off troops at Bombay, then sailed to Singapore, then was lost without trace. Sadler has a copy of his Will. (Byrnes, The Blackheath Connection, p. 97.) Magnus Johnson made many voyages on convict ships.

Magnus Johnson

Pathway to convict contractor Captain Magnus Johnson - little information so far(Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

On Charles Johnson. More to come.

27 April 1818: To Samuel Francis Somes (his first contract). Convict transport Maria. Shelton´s Accounts No. 71.

Samuel Francis Somes

Wapping: Pathway to convict contractor Samuel Francis Somes (1786-1829) More to come From a website - The Seaxe Newsletter of the Middlesex Heraldry Society Editor – Stephen Kibbey, 3 Cleveland Court, Kent Avenue, Ealing, London, W13 8BJ No. 51. (Founded 1976). February 2006.
The Man who Bought the India Fleet
Andrew Gray
In the Tudor Chapel at Ightham Mote there is a single hatchment. It is quite small, painted on silk, and almost the entire achievement is bogus. Around the lower frame an inscription leaves no doubt as to the subject’s identity: Used at the funeral of Joseph Somes, Esq., M.P. at Stepney Church, July 2nd, 1845.
The Somes were native Eastenders; Joseph’s father Samuel was a Wapping coal merchant, probably a barge-owner. Joseph was baptised at the relatively new Hawksmoor church of St George in the East, in 1787, and married at the age of 24 to Mary Ann Daplyn, the daughter of a Mile End carpenter. The young Joseph progressed from waterman through lighterman and ship’s chandler to shipowner, and in the 1830s he shrewdly bought many of the ships of the East India Company - which in 1833 had been deprived of its trading functions - earning him the title of the largest shipowner in Britain. His objective was to join the booming trade in transporting people to the Antipodes, whether voluntarily as migrants or involuntarily as convicts, as many genealogy websites from Australia and New Zealand will attest. The arms which appear on his hatchment are: Ermine a cinquefoil gules, on a canton azure a (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

1818: Samuel Francis Somes (1786-1829). By 1818 was active as a convict contractor. He has been noted as having the following addresses. Broad Street, ratcliff, Midx. Once of Stepney, Midx. Of 16 St Helen´s Place, and of Fortismere, Muswell Hill. (Website on WH Auden - Family Ghosts. Byrnes, The BC, p. 97.)

This file remains Work-in-Progress

Joseph Somes (1787-1845) . He was a younger son. His only known biog seems to be in the maritime magazine "Trident" of 1942. Joseph Somes, Contractor for convict shipment and for naval timber. Shipbuilder. Conservative MP, made a fortune. Shipowner of New Grove, Mile End London. Joseph Somes (1787-1845). Dr Andrew Gray writing on Somes as a migrant shipper says his great-grandson is Sir Thomas Colyer-Fergusson. In Manson on New Zealand, p. see C. and C. Manson on New Zealand, p. 37ff. He was of Park Street, Grosvenor Square, London. As MP successfully contested Yarmouth June 1841. Stenton, Brit Parliamentarians, Vol. 1, p. 357. Somes was in South Sea whaling and East India trade, began buying EICo ships in 1833 once the Company as a trader was inoperative. Listed in Adams, Fatal Necessity on New Zealand Co. He became the largest shipowner in England, was deputy-governor of New Zealand Co till first Earl Durham died. Somes was Governor of New Zealand Co. in 1840-1845. Broeze in British Intercontinental, p. 202, says Somes owned Parmelia bringing Governor Stirling to Western Australia in 1829, a ship later chartered twice to bring convicts to Sydney. Broeze on Brooks p. 327, Note 23, Cf., D. Morier Evans, City Men and City Manners, The City, or, the Physiology of London Business. and S. Marais, The Colonisation of New Zealand. An obituary of Somes, who had shipping investments worth about £434,000 when he died, is in Colonial Gazette, June 28, 1845. and see London newspapers variously about that date. (See Broeze on Brooks, pp. 62ff. See Bateson, Convict Ships. See F. M. L. Thompson, on life after death, pp. 57-60.) Somes was a sailmaker and shipowner of Mile End Road, he had only one child, who married Thomas Colyer of Parrock Hall, Milton, Kent, of Wombwell Hall, Northfleet Kent, also a convict contractor, who may himself have been landed and monied. Colyer married Marry Anne Somes. His own entry by A. C. Howe in English DNB 2004 edition.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Marquis of Hastings of 1839, 452 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co., commenced 29 January 1839, 150 female convicts and 20 children, sailed 17 March 1839 arrived 18 July 1839.

At right: Generic image of one of the fearsome Thames River Prison Hulks of the nineteenth century. A relevant book title here is Charles Campbell, The Intolerable Hulks. By an American writer.

Generic image of a Thames River prison hulk

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Mary Ann of 1840, 394 tons, brokered by Somes, commenced 17 September 1840, 124 female convicts and 38 children, sailed 27 November 1840, arrived 19 March 1841.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Layton of 1839, 513 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 9 May 1839, 260 male convicts. Sailed 13 July 1839, arrived 7 December 1839.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Barossa of 1839, 729 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 11 June 1839, 350 male convicts. Sailed 3 August 1839, arrived 8 December 1839.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Nautilus of 1839, 729 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 1 August 1839, 200 male convicts. Sailed 17 October 1839, arrived 15 February 1840.

J. Somes, owner of convict transport Maitland of 1840, 648 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 6 January 1840, 305 male convicts. Sailed 20 March 1840, arrived 14 July 1840.

Somes, owner of convict transport Asia of 1840, 536 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 27 February 1840, 276 male convicts. Sailed 27 April 1840, arrived 5 August 1840.

Somes, owner of convict transport Eden of 1840, 522 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 16 May 1840, 270 male convicts. Sailed 11 July 1840, arrived 18 November 1840.

Somes, owner of convict transport Lord Lynedoch of 1840, 638 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 29 July 1840, 180 female convicts and 12 children. Sailed 11 September 1840, arrived 5 February 1841.

Somes, owner of convict transport Layton of 1841, 513 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 5 February 1840, 250 male convicts. Sailed 9 April 1841, arrived 1 September 1841.

Somes, owner of convict transport Mexborough of 1841, 376 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 22 May 1841, 145 female convicts and 35 children. Sailed 12 August 1841, arrived 26 December 1841.

Somes, owner of convict transport Prince Regent of 1841, 394 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 22 May 1841, 181 male convicts. Sailed 7 August 1841, arrived 6 January 1842.

Somes, owner of convict transport Barossa of 1841, 720 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 1 July 1841, 350 male convicts. Sailed 1 July 1841, arrived 13 January 1842.

Somes, owner of convict transport Sir George Arthur of 1842, 339 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 3 March 1842, convicts not given, wrecked at Bermuda. arrived 3 June 1842.

Somes, owner of convict transport Emily of 1842, 461 tons, brokered by Pirie and Co. Commenced 14 April 1842, 240 male convicts. Sailed 29 June 1842, arrived 21 November 1842.

Somes (albeit given as Sonies (sic), owner of convict transport Marquis of Hastings of 1842, 452 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 11 May 1842, 240 male convicts. Sailed 17 July 1842, arrived 7 November 1842.

Somes, owner of convict transport Maitland of 1843, 648 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 7 June 1843, 199 male convicts. Sailed 1 September 1843, arrived 12 January 1844.

Somes, owner of convict transport Cadet of 1844, 648 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced either 5 January or February 1844, 164 male convicts. Sailed 9 April 1844, 21 August 1844.

Somes, owner of convict transport Maria Somes of 1844, 600 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 6 March 1844, 264 male convicts. Sailed 26 April 1844, arrived 29 July 1844.

Somes, owner of convict transport Barossa of 1844, 729 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 11 March 1844, 170 female convicts and 20 children. Sailed 29 April 1844, arrived 21 August 1844.

Somes, owner of convict transport Angelina of 1844, 366 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 20 March 1844, 170 female convicts and 20 children. Sailed 29 April 1844, arrived 21 August 1844.

Somes, owner of convict transport Sir George Seymour of 1844, 730 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 6 September 1844, 345 male convicts. Sailed 8 November 1844, arrived not given.

Somes, owner of convict transport La Belle Alliance of 1844, 676 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 28 November 1844, 200 male convicts. Sailed 17 January 1845, arrived 8 February to Gibraltar not Australia.

Somes, owner of convict transport Mount Stuart Elphinstone of 1844, 611 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 14 December 1844, 260 male convicts. Sailed 3 March 1845, arrived 4 July 1845.

J. and F. Somes, owner of convict transport Tory of 1845, 432 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 6 February 1845, 170 female convicts and 35 children. Sailed 22 March 1845, arrived 4 July 1845.

J. and F. Somes, owner of convict transport Adelaide of 1846, 639 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 28 May 1846, 300 male convicts. Sailed 11 July 1846, arrived not reported.

In 1829-1831, Joseph Somes and Thomas Ward of 22 Great Alice Street, were contracting timber supply to navy yards (using ships Harriet and Britannia, Brailsford, Prince of Wales, Champion, Argo, Ocean, Doris, Old Maid, Arcadia, some of which ships lost five masters five mates and 25 seamen by fever at Sierra Leone, fever thought to have been brought in on a slave ship a prize of HM Eden) in association with Samuel Lenox, Zachary Macaulay and M. Forster, "the three principal merchants in the African trade", ie., Sierra Leone. In 1828 and later, Commissioners to Navy were J. Tucker, R. Dundas and J. M. Lewis, also with them is H. Legge, then with them are R. Seppings, R. C. Middleton, J. M. Lewis, T. B. Martin. Website on WH Auden - Family Ghosts.

There was also a Rev. William Alfred Somes resident at Blackheath, who seems to have become detached from his family history.

There was also a Thomas Somes 1801-1825 of Boston Massachusetts a commercial merchant, per the Boston Directory for 1810 edited by Edward Cotton, Boston, printed by Munroe and Francis.

8 May 1818: To William Parker (his first contract). Convict transport Glory. Shelton´s Accounts No. 72. A webpage on the convicts she carried is at: www.historyaustralia.org.au/twconvic/Glory+1818/. She sailed in May 1818 and arrived Sydney 14 September 1818.

William Parker

William Parker. Still a problem person for research by October 2012. He was possibly of John Street America Square and maybe died in 1830/1831.

10 July 1818: To Thomas Ward (his second contract). Convict transport Morley. Shelton´s Accounts No. 73.

10 July 1818: To Robert Granger (his first contract) and probably a master/owner. Convict transport General Stuart. Shelton´s Accounts No. 74. He was once possibly captain on an EICo ship General Stewart (sic) in 1816. This ship was 635 tons, departing England on 19 July 1818.

Robert Granger

Robert Granger. MAster/Owner. Still a problem person for research by October 2012.

10 July 1818: To John Robertson Bell (probably his sixth contract). Convict transport Lord Melville. Shelton´s Accounts No. 75.

10 July 1818: To George Lyall (his second contract). Convict transport Shipley. Shelton´s Accounts No. 76.

15 August 1818: To William Parker (his second contract). Convict transport Hadlow. Shelton´s Accounts No. 77.

2 September 1818: To John Robertson [John Robertson Bell? his seventh contract]. Convict transport Globe. Shelton´s Accounts No. 78.

15 September 1818: To John Short. Convict transport Lord Sidmouth. Shelton´s Accounts No. 79.

John Short

on John Short. Still a problem person for research by October 2012.

19 September 1818: To Magnus Johnson (his first contract). Convict transport Surrey. Shelton´s Accounts No. 80.

14 November 1818: To Henry Taylor (his first contract). Convict transport Hibernia. Shelton´s Accounts No. 81.

Henry Taylor

Pathway to convict contractor Henry Taylor active 1819 - little information so far. Still a problem person for research by October 2012. (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

14 December 1818: To Walter Buchanan (firm´s ninth contract). Convict transport Baring. Shelton´s Accounts No. 82.

Year 1819

6 April 1819: To George Faith (his second contract). Convict transport Canada. Shelton´s Accounts No. 83.

24 April 1819: To Thomas Barry Esq - John Barry (his first contract). Convict transport ???. Shelton´s Accounts No. 84. (This is a very confusing entry in Shelton´s Accounts. There is no reason so far to associate this Thomas Barry with convict contractor John Barry of a later date, but who knows? - Ed )

By September 2016 this website had heard newly from Ray Taylor (raytaylor.com@talktalk.net) re the Barry family of Whitby. (See the website www.raytaylor.com). The Barry shipyard founder at Whitby was Robert Barry (1725-1793), son of William. John Barry (1759-1837) of Whitby was a son of Robert (died 1793). The names of the Barry wives are unknown until we are told who was the wife of John Barry (died 1837), who was Hannah Wait/Waits, daughter of Thomas. Hannah had about seven children including Robert the Elder (who married Dorothy Havside), Rev. William Barry who married Frances Amelia Fennis, Eliza Barry who married John Campion, Maria Barry who married shipowner Henry Simpson; and possibly a son Thomas, a farmer or a local agent for Lloyd's of London. Dorothy Haviside has several children including two sons who became clergymen. Dorothy was daughter of John Havside/Heaviside, a dyer who had links to London. This John Haviside/Heaviside had four children including Margaret who married shipbuilder John Langborne (1781-1836) and her sister Mary Snaith Haviside who married solicitor Thomas Brodrick and had amongst other children solicitor Cecil Brodrick and UK Egyptologist Mary Brodrick (1858-1933) (see her own wikipedia page). To the 1830s, the Barry family had ten or so ships in various trades, including convict transports for eastern Australia, and ships trading to North America, the Mediterranean, the Baltic area, During the Napoleonic Wars the Barry operations had included chartering ships to government for military use.

28 April 1819: To John Blackett (his first contract). Convict transport Grenada. Shelton´s Accounts No. 85.

John Blackett

Pathway to convict contractor John Blackett - active 1825. It is possible Grenada was co-owned by John Blackett and Captain Alexander Anderson of Allendale who had a land grant of 1000 acres on the Hunter River in NSW named Allendale/Allandale (?). Captain Anderson was master of several convict transports, and had married Harriet Allen who had five children, one named Alexander John Blackett Anderson. Little information so far and remains a problem person for research. Possibly had an address at 26 Birchin Lane as a broker? See Bateson, lists, p. 384.) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

17 May 1819: To George Clay (his first contract). Convict transport Lord Wellington. Shelton´s Accounts No. 86.

George Clay

On George Clay. A London Gazette item, 30 June 1820, indicates ... Newspaper notice re dissolution due to the retirement of Felix Clay, of the partnership of Felix Clay, George Clay and William Clay the Younger, of 38 Old Broad Street, merchants and shipowners. Business would continue at 38 Old Broad Street with George Clay and William Clay the Younger. Men of such names were London goldsmiths by 1704.

This file remains Work-in-Progress

5 June 1819: To James Hill (his first contract). Convict transport Atlas. Shelton´s Accounts No. 87.

James Hill

On James Hill. Still a problem person for research by October 2012.

12 June 1819: To Charles Johnson. Convict transport Malabar. Shelton´s Accounts No. 88.

29 July 1819: To John Chapman. Convict transport Recovery. Shelton´s Accounts No. 89.

20 September 1819: To Joseph Lachlan (his third contract). Convict transport Eliza. Shelton´s Accounts No. 90.

5 October 1819: To William Wilkinson (his first contract). Convict transport Prince Regent. Shelton´s Accounts No. 91.

September 1819: To Government. Convict transport HM Dromedary. Shelton´s Accounts No. 92.

October 1819: To Government. Convict transport HM Coromandel. Shelton´s Accounts No. 93.

23 October 1819: To Joseph Lachlan (his fourth contract). Convict transport Janus. Shelton´s Accounts No. 94.

According to Bateson, The Convict Ships, and various other sources, from 1810 to 1820, active convict contractor names sending convicts to Australia included Buckle, Buckle, Bagster and Buchanan by 1811. Mangles. Peter Evet Mestaers. Possibly Yves Hurry. Reeve and Green. Birch and Ward. A. Chapman. Bell/Wilkinson. John Morley. Lyall. Somes of Durham. J. P, Larkins. Attys possibly. Stuart and Co. John Blackett of Hull. J. Green and Co. Johnson and Sons (Was this Captain Magnus Johnson?). Gibbon and Co. Blacketts. Thomas Ward and Co. Hovelds.

Gibbon and Co.

Pathway to convict contractor Gibbon and Co - little information so far. There was a John Gibbon Jnr. of Limehouse Hole Stairs, Poplar a Mast and Block maker, who was insured in 1831. Still a problem firm for research by October 2012. (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

Birch and Ward

Pathway to convict contractor Birch and Ward - (See Bateson, Convict Ships. Little information so far. (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

Year 1820

16 March 1820: To John Robertson (his eighth contract). Convict transport Neptune. Shelton´s Accounts No. 95.

24 March 1820: To Walter Buchanan (firm´s tenth contract). Convict transport Mangles. Shelton´s Accounts No. 96.

5 April 1820: To George Longster (his first contract). Convict transport Earl St Vincent. Shelton´s Accounts No. 97.

George Longster

Islington, London: Pathway to convict contractor (active by 1819) George Longster of Highbury Terrace Islington when he bankrupted. See him noted maybe 1818 in London Gazette as a bankrupt. Then of No. 6, Highbury-Terrace, Islington, merchant, and on the same page, Commission of Bankrupts in 15 December 1818 has an issue against John St Barbe of Austin Friars, merchant, shipowner, dealer and chapman, re joint estate and effects of John St Barbe and Peter Kennion. This connection of St Barbe is very little-known. (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

George Longster (no dates) married Miss Sutton, daughter of W. Sutton of Colebrooke Row, Islington, London and they may have had a daughter in 1817. Still a problem person for research by October 2012.

According to Bateson, The Convict Ships, and various other sources, from 1820 to 1830, active convict contractor names sending convicts to Australia included Buckle, Buckle, Bagster and Buchanan by 1821. Johnson and Sons. Thomas Ward. J. Blackett. John Barry (probably the Whitby shipbuilder John Barry). Stuart and Co. Hibbersons. Lyall. Mangles. Hovelds? Attys. John Morley. Gibbon and Co. Champion. A. Chapman. Carr. S. and I. Soames. Possibly Wigram.

Stuart

Pathway to convict contractor Stuart active 1825 - little information so far (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

Hovelds

Hovelds. Information on the Internet by April 2012 is difficult to find on Hovelds. Still a problem person for research by October 2012.

Joseph Hibberson

Pathway to convict contractor Joseph Hibberson and Co, Merchants and Shipowners of 22 New Quay, Liverpool. Still a problem person for research by October 2012. (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

24 April 1820: To William Wilkinson (his second contract). Convict transport Agamemnon. Shelton´s Accounts No. 98.

8 May 1820: To Magnus Johnson (his third contract). Convict transport Guildford. Shelton´s Accounts No. 99.

13 May 1820: To Thomas Ward (his third contract). Convict transport Morley. Shelton´s Accounts No. 100.

19 May 1820: To George Lyall (his third contract). Convict transport Shipley. Shelton´s Accounts No. 101.

4 July 1820: To Henry Blanchard (his first contract). Convict transport Caledonia. Shelton´s Accounts No. 102.

21 July 1820: To Joseph Lachlan (his fifth contract). Convict transport Maria. Shelton´s Accounts No. 103.

26 July 1820: To Thackeray Wetherell (his first contract). Convict transport Hebe. Shelton´s Accounts No. 104.

10 August 1820: To Joseph Lachlan (his sixth contract). Convict transport Elizabeth. Shelton´s Accounts No. 105.

28 August 1820: To William Hay Leith (his first contract). Convict transport Asia. Shelton´s Accounts No. 106.

William Hay Leith

On William Hay Leith, Convict contractor of the 1820s, noted in Shelton´s Accounts. London newspaper notice of 1 January 1855, re Dissolution by mutual consent due to retirement of William Hay Leith, of the parternship Forbes Forbes and Co. of London, East India agents, being Sir Charles Forbes, William Hay Leith and James Malcolmson (rather elusive for research), dissolved 31 December 1854. A new partnership would continue as Forbes Forbes and Co. of London with Sir Charles Forbes, James Malcolmson and John Bowman, ex Forbes and Co. of Bombay (who remains elusive for research. He does not seem to be the earlier merchant in India John Bowman who had married Barbara Gillanders, and it is not clear if he might have been their son).

This file remains Work-in-Progress

William Hay Leith was apparently son of Alexander Leith (died 1828) and Mary Elizabeth Gordon. He had a brother, James Leith (born 1777 at Glenkindie in Scotland) a Canada fur trader noted in Dictionary of Canadian Biography online. James seems to have gone to Canada with George Leith a merchant of Detroit, and linked with the fur-trading North-West Co. (or, The XY Co.) Was a partner with North-West Co. in 1821 when it merged with the Hudson´s Bay Co and became a chief factor. Retired from Canada by 1831. James was regarded as ¨an aloof and colourless character¨ but was interested in christianizing Canadian Indians. William Hay Leith also a brother General Sir Alexander Leith KCB (died 1859), who married Maria Thorp and then Mary Mackenzie. Maria Thorp was mother of Major James Leith VC (1826-1869) who was awarded his VC due to action in Persia.

30 August 1820: To Joseph Pinsent (his first contract). Convict transport Juliana. Shelton´s Accounts No. 107.

Joseph Pinsent

This file remains Work-in-Progress

Pathway to convict contractor Joseph Pinsent active 1820 - little information so far (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

30 October 1820: To Joseph Lachlan (his seventh contract). Convict transport Dick. Shelton´s Accounts No. 108.

6 October 1820: To Joseph Lachlan (his eighth contract). Convict transport Prince of Orange. Shelton´s Accounts No. 109.

11 November 1820: To John Pirie (his first contract). Convict transport Medway. Shelton´s Accounts No. 110.

John Pirie

Migrant shipping 1836: The 1836 ship to Western Australia Emma (160-tons) was built at Newcastle-on-Tyne in 1824 and owned by John Pirie and Co. Traded variously to West Indies and South America. John Pirie also owned half of the small ship coming to Australia about 1836, John Pirie, which was only 19 metres long.

Pirie and Co., owner of convict transport Canton of 1839, 506 tons, brokered by Pirie and Co. Commenced 29 July 1839, 240 male convicts. Sailed 22 September 1839, arrived 12 Jan 1840.

Pirie and Co., owner of convict transport Augusta Jessie of 1839, 380 tons, brokered by Pirie and Co. Commenced 7 September 1839, 155 male convicts. Sailed 11 November 1839, arrived 25 February 1840.

Pirie: More to come. Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

15 December 1820: To Joseph Lachlan (his ninth contract). Convict transport Speke. Shelton´s Accounts No. 111.

Year 1821

5 January 1821: To John Robertson (his ninth contract). Convict transport Lady Ridley. Shelton´s Accounts No. 112.

26 March 1821: To Joseph Lachlan (his tenth contract). Convict transport Adamant. Shelton´s Accounts No. 113.

7 April 1821: To Joseph Lachlan (his eleventh contract). Convict transport Lady Harcourt. Shelton´s Accounts No. 114.

1 May 1821: To Joseph Lachlan (his twelth contract). Convict transport Grenada. Shelton´s Accounts No. 115.

6 June 1821: To William Bottomley (his first contract). Convict transport Providence. Shelton´s Accounts No. 116.

Bottomley

Bottomley, owner of convict transport Westmoreland of 1841. Brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 25 March, 202 male convicts. Sailed 19 May, arrived 12 September.

Owner of convict transport Royal Admiral of 1842, 441 tons, brokered by Bottomley. Commenced 28 January 1842, sailed 204 female convicts, no children, sailed 5 May, arrived 26 Setepmber.

Bottomley: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

Robert W. Brooks

Pathway to convict contractor Robert W. Brooks - More to come (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

16 June 1821: To Joseph Lachlan (his thirteenth contract). Convict transport Malabar. Shelton´s Accounts No. 117.

23 July 1821: To Christopher Richardson (his first contract). Convict transport Hindostan. Shelton´s Accounts No. 118. (Hindostan made three voyages as a convict transport says the Warren Register of Colonial Tall Ships, once under Captain George Lamb; she was built at Whitby in 1819m 445 tons, .)

23 July 1821: To William Wilkinson (his third contract). Convict transport Minerva. Shelton´s Accounts No. 119.

2 August 1821: To William Wilkinson (his fourth contract). Convict transport ???. Shelton´s Accounts No. 120.

20 March 1821: To William Wilkinson (his fifth contract). Convict transport Claudine. Shelton´s Accounts No. 121. (See website www.convictrecords.com.au, she carried 160 passengers and in 1829 again carried 180 passengers to NSW.) Claudine was 460 tons built at Calcutta of teak in 1811.

28 August 1821: To William Wilkinson (his six contract). Convict transport Mary. Shelton´s Accounts No. 122.

26 October 1821: To Joseph Lachlan (his fourteenth contract). Convict transport Shipley. Shelton´s Accounts No. 123.

15 November 1821: To John Blackett (his second contract). Convict transport Phoenix. Shelton´s Accounts No. 124.

22 November 1821. To Joseph Lachlan (his fifteenth contract). Convict transport Richmond. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 125

11 December 1821. William Parker (his third contract). Convict transport Mary Ann. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 126

Year 1822

21 March 1822. Joseph L achlan (his sixteenth contract). Convict transport Prince of Orange. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 127

30 March 1822. William Hay Leith (his second contract). Convict transport Asia. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 128. (See note on him above.)

3 April 1822. Joseph Lachlan (his seventeenth contract). Convict transport Guildford. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 129

19 June 1822. To Henry Blanshard (his second contract). Convict transport Caledonia. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 130

Henry Blanchard

On Henry Blanshard. (Blanchard?) He was probably the ship and insurance broker of 4 Birchin Lane in 1812 and 1 Old Broad Street in 1825, according to a listing of London merchants named Blanshard. He is noted in Shelton´s Accounts as a convict contractor. (See J. M. R. Cameron on Melville Island, p. 91.) He was perhaps father of the London banker, Henry Blanshard Junior, a banker with Willis and Percival at 76 Lombard Street, who were Henry Blanshard Jnr of Upper Bedford Place. Richard Percival of Highbury Park. Richard McPherson of 76 Lombard Street, Henry Willis of Horton Lodge, Epsom and Samuel Tomkins of Albert Road, Regents Park.

Henry Blanshard

This file remains Work-in-Progress

Henry Blanshard. (Sometimes given as Henry Blanchard.) He was a ship and insurance broker of 4 Birchin Lane in 1812 and of 1 Old Broad Street in 1825 according to a listing of London merchants named Blanshard. Is noted in Shelton´s Accounts as a convict contractor. (See J. M. R. Cameron on Melville Island, p. 91.) He was perhaps father of the London banker, Henry Blanshard Jnr. who was a banker with Willis and Percival at 76 Lombard Street, who were Henry Blanshard Jnr of Upper Bedford Place, a bank which had involvements with Masonic lodges. Richard Percival of Highbury Park. Richard McPherson of 76 Lombard Street, and Henry Willis of Horton Lodge, Epsom, plus Samuel Tomkins of Albert Road, Regents Park. Henry Blanshard once employed the 16-year-old Sir John Morphett, (1809-1892) pioneer of South Australia, landowner and politician, and subject of a wikipedia page. Morphett later worked for a firm, Wilson and Blanshard. At 21 Morphett was with Harris and Co. in Alexandria where he met Colonel William Light, both were later in South Australia. Morphett returned to London in 1834 and became interested in SA colonisation plans. He emigrated there, became a noted pioneer and was incidentally a Freemason.

8 July 1822. To Henry Blanshard (his third contract). Convict transport Arab. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 131.

In 1818, Thames owned by Henry Blanshard. (In 1830, the British government made an examination of ships let from 1811 to the service of the East India Co. Amongst the shipowner and ship names listed, some are noted as ships carrying convicts to Australia. Follows an extraction from the list, which is on a webpage provided by www.british-history.ac.uk - an aspx-generated report.)

In 1823, Lord Lowther owned by Henry Blanshard. (In 1830, the British government made an examination of ships let from 1811 to the service of the East India Co. Amongst the shipowner and ship names listed, some are noted as ships carrying convicts to Australia. Follows an extraction from the list, which is on a webpage provided by www.british-history.ac.uk - an aspx-generated report.)

In 1825 Countess of Harcourt owned by Henry Blanshard. (In 1830, the British government made an examination of ships let from 1811 to the service of the East India Co. Amongst the shipowner and ship names listed, some are noted as ships carrying convicts to Australia. Follows an extraction from the list, which is on a webpage provided by www.british-history.ac.uk - an aspx-generated report.)

12 July 1822. To Joseph Lachlan (his eighteenth contract). Convict transport Eliza. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 132.

6 September 1822. To Joseph Lachlan (his nineteenth contract). Convict transport Lord Sidmouth. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 133.

18 September 1822. To Thomas Ward (his fourth contract). Convict transport Morley. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 134.

28 September 1822. To Joseph Lachlan (his twentieth contract). Convict transport Princess Royal. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 135.

2 October 1822. To Joseph Lachlan (his twenty first contract). Convict transport Surrey. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 136.

Year 1823

17 March 1823. To Joseph Lachlan (his 22nd contract). Convict transport Competitor. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 137.

15 April 1823. To Joseph Lachlan (his 23rd contract). Convict transport Commodore Hay. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 138.

19 April 1823. To Joseph Lachlan (his 24th contract). Convict transport Ocean. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 139.

22 April 1823. To Joseph Lachlan (his 25th contract). Convict transport Henry. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 140.

15 May 1823. To Joseph Lachlan (his 26th contract). Convict transport Albion. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 141.

2 June 1823. To Joseph Lachlan (his 27th contract). Convict transport Mary. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 142.

26 July 1823. To Joseph Lachlan (his 28th contract). Convict transport Asia. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 143.

30 July 1823. To Joseph Lachlan (his 29th contract). Convict transport Sir Godfrey Webster. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 144.

20 August 1823. To Joseph Lachlan (his 30th contract). Convict transport Guilford. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 145.

19 November 1823. To Thomas Chapman (his second contract). Convict transport Brothers. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 146.

Year 1824

3 March 1824. To Edward Rule (his first contract). Convict transport Countess of Harcourt. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 147. (Countess of Harcourt had shipped troops to Madras about March 1821 and by August 1821 had delivered convicts to the Derwent. She landed convicts at Sydney about 26 December 1822. On one of her trips she was under Captain George Bunn.)

Edward Rule

Disembarking at an Australian port

On Edward Rule. Still a problem person for research by October 2012.

27 March 1824. To Joseph Lachlan (his 31st contract). Convict transport Phoenix. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 148.

2 April 1824. To Thomas Chapman (his third contract). Convict transport Chapman. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 149.

2 July 1824. To Henry Mole Bagster of Buckle, Buckle, Bagster and Buchanan (this firm´s 11th contract). Convict transport Princess Charlotte for VDL. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 150.

6 July 1824. To Henry Mole Bagster (this firm´s 12th contract). Convict transport Mangles. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 151.

6 July 1824. To William Wilkinson. Convict transport Minerva. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 152.

23 September 1824. To Joseph Lachlan (his 32nd contract). Convict transport Grenada. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 153.

30 September 1824. To Joseph Lachlan (his 33rd contract). Convict transport Henry. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 154.

21 October 1824. To Joseph Lachlan (his 34th contract). Convict transport Asia. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 155.

2 November 1824. To William Richardson (his first contract). Convict transport Lady East. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 156.

1 November 1824. To William Abercrombie (his first contract). Convict transport Royal Charlotte. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 157.

On William Abercrombie

William Abercrombie by data collected in 2017 was a London ships chandler and sailmaker partner with John Macintosh. Convict contractors. Macintosh was once of Jewin Street then of Cornhill London. In April 2012 all that could be found on the Internet is the following. William Henry Abercrombie was of Goodge Street, Tottenham, probably not the convict contractor. Or, as a newspaper notice states to effect, that William Abercrombie and John Macintosh were sail-makers, ships chandlers and ship and insurance brokers. An online item from Law Advertiser states they had dissolved their partnership by 1830.

Abercrombie was maybe a ships chandler and sailmaker partner with John Macintish (of Jewin St then of Cornhill), dissolved in 1830. 27-11-2014 Assoc with 1824-1826 convict ship voyage of Sir Charles Forbes, Capt Thomas Foulseston. which he co-owned with Scots, the owners were George McInnes, a shipowner of Old Aberdeen, George Forbes of Springhill, Thomas Fouleston a ships master plus Harry Lumsden, Robert Grant, James Forbes, Dr James Moir, James Scott of Brotherton, and London merchant William Abercrombie as listed in Aberdeen Register of Shipping, Aberdeen City Archives. Later owned by T. Waddell, Thomas Wrd then by J. Rodgers. who used Capt W. Prynn. Seems to have links to Aberdeen shipping, possibly of Bircher Lane, with Thomas Edwards a mahogany broker of Nicholas Lane (who is hard to find) dealt for or with Gibbon and Co., deceased Aberdeen merchant Arthur Gibbon, and Londoners William Forbes Gibbon and Robert Gibbon of City Chambers London re brig Ocean in 1826 Capt A Hogg and later Capt J. Struthers. Does he have brother Charles? Convict contractor. Pathways new. In April 2012 all we find on the Internet is the following. William Henry Abercrombie was of Goodge Street, Tottenham, probably not the convict contractor. Or, as newspaper notice states to effect that William Abercrombie and John Macintosh were sail-makers, ships chandlers and ship and insurance brokers. Online item from Law Advertiser indicates they disssolved partnership by 1830. Does he have shares in ship Sir Charles Forbes of 1824 launched 1824 with Captain Thomas Fouleston, with subscribing owners George McInness of Old Aberdeen, George Forbes, Thomas Fouleston, Harry Lumsden, Robert Grant, James Forbes, Dr. James Moir, James Scott from Aberdeen Register of Shipping. Ship Sir Charles Forbes went 1826-1827 to NSW owned McInnes, Captain Fullarton, by 1841 was owned by T. Ward, to London-NSW, later to NZ, by 1848 sold to J. Rodgers, master W. Prynn. Built by A. Hall and Co Aberdeen. Aberdeen shipbuilders included: Hall Russell and Co Ltd., Alexander Hall and Sons Ltd., John Lewis and Sons Ltd,. Duthie shipbuilders, Walter Hood and Co. Maybe associated with ships agent Thomas Edwards of of Nicholas Lane.

This seems to have been William Abercrombie (active 1820s with parents unknown), married to Rachel Walker and with children William A., John of Bengal Horse Artillery who married Rosalinda Helena Angelo a daughter of Lt-Colonel of Bengal Cavalry, John William Thomas Angelo (1792-1860) and Louisa Neate a daughter of Major Richard Neate and Elizabeth Maria Ansaldo ; Letitia Margaret A. (born 1817), Arthur Wellesley A. (born 1819) and Robert A. (born 1820). All children were born in Wapping/Tower Hamlets

In 1825 Eliza owned by William Abercrombie. (In 1830, the British government made an examination of ships let from 1811 to the service of the East India Co. Amongst the shipowner and ship names listed, some are noted as ships carrying convicts to Australia. Follows an extraction from the list, which is on a webpage provided by www.british-history.ac.uk - an aspx-generated report.)

22 November 1824. To William Hay Leith (his third contract). Convict transport Sir Charles Forbes. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 158.

13 December 1824. To Walter Buchanan (this firm´s 13th contract). Convict transport Hercules. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 159.

Year 1825

In 1825, Lady Kennaway owned by George Joad (a ropemaker, George Joad of 21 Princes Street Rotherhithe, insured there), was let to the EICo. Joad is now known as a convict contractor, Joad put ship Lady Kennaway to service of EICo in 1825. Master Mariner of Ramsgate, partner with Edward Spencer Curling qv. A Ropemaker at Rotherhithe. Lady Kennaway was a convict ship in 1836 and in 1851 says www.convictrecords.com.au. ()In 1830, the British government made an examination of ships let from 1811 to the service of the East India Co. Amongst the shipowner and ship names listed, some are noted as ships carrying convicts to Australia. Follows an extraction from the list, which is on a webpage provided by www.british-history.ac.uk - an aspx-generated report.)

4 April 1825. To Joseph Lachlan (his 35th contract). Convict transport Minstrel. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 160.

11 April 1825. To Alexander Mount Greig (his first contract). Convict transport Norfolk. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 161.

16 April 1825. To Joseph Horsley (his first contract). Convict transport Medina. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 162.

Joseph Horsley

On Joseph Horsley (1781-1833) of Billiter Square, London. Possibly buried in Woolwich Churchyard. Still a problem person for research by October 2012.

11 July 1825. To Joseph Lachlan (his 36th contract). Convict transport Midas. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 163.

22 July 1825. To John Pirie (his second contract). Convict transport Medway. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 164.

17 August 1825. To Joseph Lachlan (his 37th contract). Convict transport Marquis of Hastings. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 165.

19 November 1825. To Joseph Lachlan (his 38th contract). Convict transport Sesostris. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 166.

29 November 1825. To Joseph Lachlan (his 39th contract). Convict transport Woodman. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 167.

8 December 1825. To Joseph Lachlan (his 40th contract). Convict transport Providence. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 168.

Year 1826

10 April 1826. To Joseph Barker Chapman (his first contract). Convict transport Chapman. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 169. He died at Airy Hill, Whitby aged 74 on 6 June 1872. He had a son Joseph John Chapman born 1837 who married to Fanny Simpson, daughter of Henry Simpson of Whitby.

18 April 1826. To Richard Mount (his first contract). Convict transport Earl St Vincent. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 170.

Richard Mount

On Richard Mount (1755-1822 born in Bavaria, buried in Walthamstow). Parents unknown. He had two wives, (1) Elizabeth Smith (died 1795) (parents not listed) and (2) Jane Duncalfe (parents not listed), Jane had a daughter Mary Anne Mount who married Thomas Ayles and a son Richard Mount who emigrated to Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand and died in 1861. See, Mark Howard, Richard Mount, London Shipowner, Note in The Mariner's Mirror, Vol. 103, No. 1, January 2017, pp. 93-97

27 April 1826. To Joseph Lachlan (his 41st contract). Convict transport England. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 171.

9 May 1826. To Joseph Lachlan (his 42nd contract). Convict transport Marquis of Huntley. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 172.

29 July 1826. To John Chapman (his fifth contract). Convict transport Woodford. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 173.

4 August 1826. To Joseph Lachlan (his 43rd contract). Convict transport Speke. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 174.

30 August 1826. To Thomas Phillips (sic) (his first contract). Convict transport Sir Charles Forbes. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 175.

31 August 1826. To Joseph Lachlan (his 44th contract). Convict transport Grenada. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 176.

20 September 1826. To Joseph Lachlan (his 45th contract). Convict transport Albion. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 177.

5 October 1826. To Joseph Lachlan (his 46th contract). Convict transport Midas. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 178.

7 October 1826. To Joseph Lachlan (his 47th contract). Convict transport Andromeda. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 179.

Year 1827

19 March 1827. To Joseph Lachlan (his 48th contract). Convict transport Guildford. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 180.

23 March 1827. To Joseph Lachlan (his 49th contract). Convict transport Governor Ready. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 181.

26 March 1827. To Joseph Lachlan (his 50th contract). Convict transport Princess. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 182.

6 April 1827. To Joseph Lachlan (his 51st contract). Convict transport Persian. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 183.

9 April 1827. To Joseph Lachlan (his 52nd contract). Convict transport Manlius. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 184.

12 April 1827. To Joseph Lachlan (his 53rd contract). Convict transport Marquis of Hastings. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 185.

11 May 1827. To Joseph Lachlan (his 54th contract). Convict transport Harmony. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 186.

23 May 1827. To Joseph Lachlan (his 55th contract). Convict transport Champion. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 187.

6 June 1827. To Joseph Lachlan (his 56th contract). Convict transport Prince Regent. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 188.

12 June 1827. To Joseph Lachlan (his 57th contract). Convict transport Layton. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 189.

9 July 1827. To Thomas Hall (his first contract). Convict transport Sovereign. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 190.

16 July 1827. To Joseph Lachlan (his 58th contract). Convict transport John. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 191.

25 July 1827. To Joseph Lachlan (his 59th contract). Convict transport Asia. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 192.

11 August 1827. To Joseph Lachlan (his 60th contract). Convict transport Asia. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 193.

13 August 1827. To Joseph Lachlan (his 61st contract). Convict transport Florentia. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 194.

20 August 1827. To Joseph Lachlan (his 62nd contract). Convict transport Louisa. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 195.

30 October 1827. To John William Buckle (firm´s 13th contract). Convict transport Hoogley. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 196.

2 November 1827. To Thomas Chapman (his sixth contract). Convict transport Marmion. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 197.

16 November 1827. William Hay Leith (his 4th contract). Convict transport Ship name mislaid. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 198.

Year 1828

13 February 1828. To Osbert Forsyth (his first contract). Convict transport Mermaid. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 199.

1853: Osbert Forsyth (1779-1853). He had a daughter Isabella Anne who married a captain who sailed for Duncan Dunbar II, James Molison (1816-1869). Convict contractor noted in Shelton´s Accounts. Code-Aust. See notes from Michael Rhodes qv. Osbert Forsyth.... SHIPBROKER, FORMERLY OF LONDON AT THE TIME OF HIS DEATH. LIVED IN CORNHILL IN LONDON, AND ALSO CLAPHAM RISE. WHEN HE RETIRED FROM BUSINESS HE LIVED FIRST IN ELGIN UNTIL AFTER THE 1851 CENSUS, AND THEN MOVED TO HUNTLY WHERE HE DIED. OBIT FROM THE ELGIN COURIER of 11 MARCH 1853 'AT HUNTLY ON THE 25TH FEBRUARY, OSBERT FORSYTH, ESQ, LATE OF GREYFRIARS, ELGIN. THE DECEASED WAS AT ONE TIME AN EXTENSIVE SHIPOWNER, AND WAS FOR MANY YEARS IN PARTNERSHIP WITH SIR JOHN PIRIE, LATE LORD MAYOR OF LONDON. BY HIS WIDOW WHO SURVIVES HIM, AND WHO IS THE DAUGHTER OF THE LATE CAPT. REID, BANFF, HE LEAVES 2 SONS AND 2 DAUGHTERS, ALL GROWN UP AND SETTLED IN LIFE.' Email from Helen Jackson of 28-8-2012. His estate returned for Probate shows he ownd 16/64ths of a ship called Ellen Simson, with the home port shown as Aberdeen. Also he owned the Grey Friars at Elgin, a house he inherited from his father-in-law, James Reid. This house was tenanted in a furnished state at the time of death. He had moved to Huntly shortly before his death, and probably to be nursed by his family. Details of the ship are as follows; ELLEN SIMSON, BARQUE, WOOD, built 1841, Shipyard number 376, length 106-5, beam 23-4, draft 17-3, The Walter Hood yard, opened in 1839, was east of Halls', next to Pocra jetty. Walter Hood had trained as a shipwright and was the yard's manager and designer until his death in 1862. Many of the sailing vessels for George Thompson's Aberdeen White Star Line were built by Hood. These vessels sailed mainly to Australia in the emigrant and wool trade. Aberdeen Line clippers built by Hood included such famous names as Neptune, Queen of Nations and Thermopylae. Phoenician, built in 1847, was the first of the Thompson vessels with a reputation for speed. At the time of its launch in August 1862, the wooden clipper Kosciusko was one of the largest sailing ships ever fitted out in Aberdeen. However, Thermopylae, the great rival of Cutty Sark, was the most famous vessel constructed at the Hood yard. Walter Hood died in 1862 after slipping in the dark and falling into the harbour. The guns of Torry Battery were fired in the hope that the concussion would bring the body to the surface but grappling irons were needed to recover the corpse.

1 March 1828. To Joseph Lachlan (his 63rd contract). Convict transport Phoenix. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 200.

12 March 1828. To William Hay Leith (his fifth contract). Convict transport Bengal Merchant. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 201.

22 March 1828. To Joseph Lachlan (his 64th contract). Convict transport Bussorah Merchant. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 202.

14 March 1828. To Joseph Lachlan (his 65th contract). Convict transport William Miles. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 203.

28 April 1828. To Thomas Chapman (his 66th contract). Convict transport Woodford. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 204.

29 April 1828. To Joseph Lachlan (his 67th contract). Convict transport Countess of Harcourt. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 205.

5 May 1828. To Joseph Lachlan (his 68th contract). Convict transport Borneo. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 206.

27 May 1828. To Joseph Lachlan (his 69th contract). Convict transport Albion. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 207.

9 June 1828. To Joseph Lachlan (his 70th contract). Convict transport Competitor. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 208.

25 June 1828. To Joseph Lachlan (his 71st contract). Convict transport Eliza. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 209.

26 June 1828. To Joseph Lachlan (his 72nd contract). Convict transport Marquis of Hastings. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 210.

15 July 1828. To Joseph Lachlan (his 73rd contract). Convict transport Manlius. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 211.

11 August 1828. To Joseph Lachlan (his 74th contract). Convict transport Roslin Castle. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 212.

18 August 1828. To Joseph Lachlan (his 75th contract). Convict transport Royal George. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 213.

25 August 1828. To Joseph Lachlan (his 76th contract). Convict transport Vittoria. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 214.

8 September 1828. To Joseph Lachlan (his 77th contract). Convict transport Harmony. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 215.

5 November 1828. To Joseph Lachlan (his 78th contract). Convict transport Princess Royal. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 216.

8 November 1828. To Joseph Lachlan (his 79th contract). Convict transport Mellish. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 217.

13 November 1828. To Joseph Lachlan (his 80th contract). Convict transport Lord Melville. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 218.

21 November 1828. To Joseph Lachlan (his 81st contract). Convict transport Georgiana. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 219.

Disembarking at an Australian port

12 March 1829. To Robert Carter (his first contract). Convict transport Waterloo. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 220.

1845: John Bonus (1795-1865). Contractor as a government emigration agent and partner with Robert Carter. Bonus was of Italian orgins. Had been at Maryland Point, Stratford Essex then had "Point House", at Bleakheath. John Bonus. Contractor for Emigration had 12 children. (Cf, variously in Broeze, Brooks, p. 224, John Bonus, partner with Robert Carter, Brooks had "long-standing and close connection" with Robert Carter. The firm Bonus and Carter lasted to 1847, then operated as R. Carter and Co. In 1844 Carter and Bonus had assisted an emigration contract, and had a major position in the Australian passenger trade. Carter and Bonus had links also to John Temperley, circa 1845. Temperley was sometimes with Temperley, Carter and Co., "salt provision merchants and shippers of bonded stores", also a freight contractor, of 117 Minories, later took over R. Carter and Co. Sometime of 81 Gracechurch St. Temperley ran a Canadian service. Carter of Bonus and Carter assisted Caroline Chisholm. Bonus had a daughter Anna who became known as a Theosophist.

1845: Re Edward William Terrick Hamilton (1809-1898), resident of NSW 1839-1855. He was a younger son of a London doctor, scion of a noted Hamilton family (Belhaven), with aristocratic and Tory background but became a Liberal. He is a fifth wrangler at Cambridge University. (thepeerage.com. Broeze on Brooks, p. 323 note 12 to chapter 9, has a note that in March 1840 arrived at Sydney two brothers of the Bishop of Salisbury, son of the ambassador at Naples, with £40,000 to invest in Australia.) Hamilton became a director of ES&A Bank to 1895. (See p. 31 of Merrett on ANZ Bank. See Terrick in Burke's P&B for Belhaven.) These Hamiltons were cousins of W. S. Davidson (Maxine Darnell's thesis, p. 60, note 136.) (See Burke's Landed Gentry for Fitzhugh of Plas Power. Burke's Peerage, 1938 for Belhaven. See also De Falbe, table. His own ADB entry to hand. On his family see Dyster, p. 373, Note 25.) Dyster on Fanning and Jones, p. 370, has it that Hamilton became a business partner with George Richard Griffiths. Hamilton became first provost or Chancellor of Sydney University. He "courted" merchant William Fanning in Sydney. Hamilton had correspondence with John Gore of London in the Australia trade after Gore's earlier Sydney partner had collapsed owing £120,000. Later, Griffiths dealt with Fanning in a new firm, Griffiths, Fanning and Co, operating out of Sydney from early 1845. Hamilton had read for the Bar but not called. Sheriff of Berkshire in 1879. (Stenton, British Parliamentarians, Vol. 1, p. 176. Burke's Peerage and Baronetage for Farquhar.) Born at Loughton, yr son, Essex, MP. Cited in Barnard, Visions and Profits on T. S. Mort, 1961. Appendix II, Biographical Notes. He is pastoralist in New England, NSW, had Collaroy Station, till mid-1850s. Chairman Australian Agricultural Co, from 1857, and later was director of several discounting houses and English and Anglo-Australasian banks.

21 March 1829. To Robert Carter (his second contract). Convict transport Lady Harewood. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 221.

Robert Carter

On Robert Carter (died 1878). Convict contractor. He was presumably the Robert Carter a partner of the firm Carter and Bonus (John Bonus), emigration agents, bounty agents, a contractor with government to ship emigrants for about 18 pounds 4/- each. The firm assisted Caroline Chisholm. (See Broeze, British Intercontinental, p. 201 on this firm as passenger brokers to Australia. Carter and Bonus were also the only London firm operating in the migrant trade to America, and were a major force in Australian trade. (Broeze on Brooks). One website says that by mid-1841, Carter and Bonus with Messrs John Gore and Co. and Robert Brooks and others, had established a new line of packets to sail from London on the first of the month, and for Cork on the 12th of each month, alternatively for Port Phillip and Sydney. See Norwich Mercury, 7 May 1836. Carter and Bonus also had the only regular line of British packets from London to New York, sailing the 10th of every month. They owned, for example, Andromeda 600 tons Captain Edward Willis. And they transported migrants to Canada (returning with cargo of timber). Carter and Bonus were at 11 Leadenhall Street, and also had links with the New Zealand Co. (John Chapman and Co. were at 2 Leadenhall Street.) Helpful here is a webpage at vicnet.net.au on Bounty agents. In 1844, for example, Carter and Bonus sent the Calcutta barque Sea Queen Captain Martin with passengers to Victoria, by a contract with HM Colonial Land and Emigration Commissioners. A genforum item indicates:
Extracts from Minutes of the Erpingham Union Poor Law Guardians – hopefully of interest. The next Volume of Minutes covering these years is now more than 80% complete.
10 Apr 1843
The case of Sarah May, belonging to the Parish of Holt, having four illegitimate children, was brought before the Guardians for their consent to allow the cost of sending her and her children to Canada, to [be] paid out of the Poor Rates of the Parish.
Resolved That this Board, having made inquiry into the particulars of the case, will not consent that the expense of sending Sarah May and family out to Canada shall be paid out of the Poor Rate, her Children having no legal protectors upon their arrival in Canada.
24 Apr 1843
A Check was signed to Messrs. Carter & Bonus amounting to the sum of £16..17..6, the same being the first moiety of Passage Money of the Holt Emigrants by the Ship Sisters to Canada.

Found in The Norwich Mercury May 26th 1832.
FOR QUEBEC
And passengers may immediately proceed to Montreal by steam boat at £6-6s each. Under contract to sail from Yarmouth on 31st May the very fine and fast sailing ship MANCHESTER carrying out a considerable number of emigrants from Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire. Apply to Robert Townshend, Great Yarmouth. To sail from the St Katherine's Dock - For Quebec the ship OCEAN, burthen 700 tons, Captain BACON, on 5th June; the ship IDA, burthen 400 tons, Captain SEATON, on 7th June; for St John, New Brunswick the ST LAWRENCE, burthen 450 tons, Captain WILDE, to sail 5th June. NB - Peculiar advantages are held out to labouring men proceeding immediately to New Brunswick. For full particulars, rates of passage &c apply to Carter & Bonus, 11 Leadenhall Street, or to James Waddell, 6 Western Entrance, London Dock and 9 Baggage Warehouse, St Katherine's Dock.

Found in The Norwich Mercury May 3rd 1834.
EMIGRATION TO VAN DIEMAN'S LAND AND NEW SOUTH WALES The following ships now loading for these Colonies are fitted in a superior manner for the accommodation and comfort of both Cabin and Steerage Passengers and as a very limited number only will be taken in each ship, to persons intending to emigrate, they will be found preferable conveyances, the whole having very lofty 'twixt decks.
For Hobart Town and Launceston, Van Dieman's Land, the fine ship JANEL, 300 tons, S. C. MATTESON commander, loading in St Katherine Dock.
For Hobart Town, V.D.L. and Sydney, N.S.W. the ship WILLIAM, 350 tons, H. SOWERBY commander, loading in St Katherine Dock.
For Sydney, N.S.W. direct the ship GOVERNOR HARCOURT, 400 tons, William DOUTLY commander lying in St Katherine Dock. Married Agricultural Labourers of good character emigrating with their wives and children will be allowed a loan from Government to aid them in paying their passage. All parties are cautioned against applying through Passage Brokers and are advised to make direct application themselves personally or by letter post paid when every information will be readily given. John Masson, 5 Lime Street Square, London. [Who was probably the same John Masson who married a sister of Duncan Dunbar II qv, and who bankrupted in the 1840s.]

On John Bonus (1795-1865). More to come.

Year 1829

3 April 1829. To Joseph Lachlan (his 82nd contract). Convict transport America. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 222.

6 April 1829. To Thomas Hall (his second contract). Convict transport Sovereign. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 223.

27 April 1829. To Joseph Lachlan (his 83rd contract). Convict transport York. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 224.

16 May 1829. To Alexander Mount Greig (his second contract). Convict transport Norfolk. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 225.

21 May 1829. To Joseph Lachlan (his 84th contract). Convict transport John. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 226.

4 June 1829. To Joseph Lachlan (his 85th contract). Convict transport Lady of the Lake. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 227.

13 June 1829. To Joseph Lachlan (his 86th contract). Convict transport Layton. Shelton´s Accounts, No. 228.

NB: Thomas Shelton who made out the contracts for convict transportation for government, died in 1829. Shelton´s main assistant for years had been his nephew John Clark, who duly took over his work as Clerk of Arraign dealing with contracts for convict transportation.

Labyrinth bluepin graphic

Year 1830-1840

According to Bateson, The Convict Ships, and various other sources, from 1830 to 1840, active convict contractor names sending convicts to Australia included: Buckle, Buckle, Bagster and Buchanan. Duncan Dunbar II. Johnsons. Carr. In 1834, Joseph Lachlan for Amphitrite. Somes. Laing. John Barry. Mangles. Larkins. Possibly Binny of Madras (?).

Samuel Moates

Pathway to convict contractor Samuel Moates (died 1831/1832). Little information so far. One of the executors of his Will was the shipbroker/convict contractor Joseph Lachlan noted above. A webpage from Ash Rare Books (www.ashrare.com) indicates this Moates (Samuel Moates and Son, ships chandlers and tarpaulin manufacturers) of 49 Lower Shadwell Street in 1832 owned ship Royal George a two-decker of 486 tons built at Hull in 1820, copper-sheathed in 1831, Captain Robert Embleton; the ship sailed to Mauritius in 1832 with tar and pitch sent by J. H. Cassell and Co., tar and pitch and varnish merchants at Mill Wall, Poplar c/- Tom´s Coffee House. Also noted at 49 Lower Shadwell Street on a UK national archives webpage. (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

So far, no genealogical information appears on any son of Samuel Moates. Samuel however married a widow, Silvia Coombes, who had had seven children with a shipping industry name, Thomas Soutter (died 1819). Follows on impression of the Soutter family genealogy.

Descendants of Baker Soutter David
1. Baker Soutter David (c.1803) sp: SNotknown Miss (c.1803) 2. Soutter Thomas husband1 Shipping (d.1819) sp: Coombes Silvia (m.1803)
3. Soutter Mary Anne (c.1835) sp: Insurance salesman Lodge Robert John (b.1810;m.1835;d.1893)
4. Lodge Junior
3. Soutter Elizabeth sp: Captain convict ship Embleton Robert (b.1796;d.1868)
4. Embleton Silvia Moates (b.1833;d.1881) sp: Emson William
5. Emson Richard Embleton (b.1854;d.1909) 5. Emson Charles Whitbourn (b.1855;d.1936) 5. Emson Percy Algernon Embleton (b.1857;d.1935) 5. Emson Herbert (b.1858) sp: Welsh Francis Fawcett
5. Welsh Frank Stuart (b.1870) 5. Welsh Silvia Mary
3. Soutter Richard Coombes 3. Soutter Silvia Ann sp: Whitbourne Francis
3. Shipowner Soutter Richard 3. Shipowner Soutter Robert 3. Shipowner Soutter Samuel 3. Shipowner Soutter Christian
2. Soutter Mary sp: Captain mariner of Stepney Harwood Robert

Thomas Hall

On Thomas Hall. Still a problem person for research by 2012.

Fenwick and Co.

Re ship Egyptian of 1839, brokered by H&C Toulmin, 359 tons, Commenced 20 Feb 1839, 190 male convicts, sailed 10 April 1839, arrived 15 August 1839.

H. and C. Toulmin

Toulmin - London convict contractor of 1839, broker or agent for ship Egyptian owned by Fenwick and Co. qv.

Henry and Calvert Toulmin: (Brothers). Also London-based mail contractors to Australia Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

Fenwick and Co.: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

James Laing

Pathway to convict contractor James Laing (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

1846: James Laing, convict contractor. His main shipbuilder rival was Scotts of Greenock. Laing was of Sunderland. He got in early with building steel ships. He had two wives and sixteen children. (See Bateson, The Convict Ships, lists, p. 399.) He had a shipyard at Deptford and built ships at Sunderland, and was active 1855- 1875. The first ship he built was Agincourt for Duncan Dunbar II and he built one ship for Dunbars each year for 12 years, the last one Laing built for them being Dunbar Castle launched in 1864. For Dunbar he built La Hogue in 1855, 226 feet and 1152 tons, for general cargo and migrants, to Australia/New Zealand, and returned with wool, sold in 1862, bought by Devitt and Moore, till 1864, stayed on the Australian run till 1886 then sold to Thomas Hick of London for the Baltic timber trade. Then sold to a Madeira coaling firm. Laings built the ship Philip Laing in 1846, an emigrant ship to Dunedin New Zealand in 1848, built for Laing and Ridley of Liverpool, the second ship to arrive at Dunedin. Left Glasgow with Captain A. J. Ellis and Rev Dr Burns in charge of Freechurch emigrants. Had Minden of 1848, a Blackwall frigate, owned Duncan Dinbar, (see items by Ward Swale) a convict ship in 1851, to Fremantle from Plymouth, possibly later sold to W. O. Young of London. In 1951 had Vimiera, for the Australian trade, for D. Dunbar I, sold to Gellatly /Sewell, then to J&R Grant, in 1887 then to To Goldfinch, all those of London, then sold to a Norwegian. In 1854 built Amity a cargo ship. In 1854 had Dunbar, about 1167 tons, clipper, three masts, emigrant /cargo ship, cost 30,000 pounds to build, was used to send troops to Crimean war, her first trip to Australia was in 1856, Captain Green and he again in 1857- but went down off Sydney. In 1855 had Black Diamond a cargo ship. In 1855 built Lowestoft, 507 tons, cargo ship, for John Viret Gooch of London, renamed Vulture. In 1857 built ship Duncan Dunbar either 1374 or 1480 tons, three masts, emigrant /cargo ship, built for Dunbar, sold in 1865 to [Edward] Gellatly Hankey and Sewell, once sailed under Captain James Banks Swanson; in 1865 ran aground on Las Roccas reef, Brazil, In 1859 built Isles of the South, emigrant ship, for Australia and New Zealand, built for Cox and Co of London, went to to Manila Philippines, In 1866 built Parramatta, of 1521 tons, for Devitt and Moore, for the Australian cargo/migrant trade, later sold to a Norwegian. For more on Laing-built ships see website http://www.searlecanada.org/sunderland/sunderland041.html. James Laing was once chair of Suez Canal Co. (See Lionel Alexander Ritchie, entry, Sir James Laing (1823-1901), Oxford Dict of Nat Biog, 2004.)

Duncan Dunbar II

Link. See a page on Dunbar from this website at: Duncan Dunbar.

Migrant shipping 1842-1843: The migrant ship to New Zealand, Westminster 513 tons Captain Forbes Michie of 1842-1843 was owned by Duncan Dunbar.

Note for 1862: Captain Henry Neatby sailed for Duncan Dunbar and after 1862 bought three of his ships.

1862: 1862: Edward Gellatly. There was a Gellatly family at Greenock 1830s-1860s. He is probably not related to the Gellatly name in Australia. Is he of Loughton when acting as executor of Will of Duncan Dunbar II? (Stephanie Jones on Inchcape, p. 34ff, this man is originally shipping manager for Duncan II Dunbar, is one of his executors, and then a founder of Gellatly, Hankey and Sewell. see p 21 of J. Forbes Munro, "gilt Illusion".) This man bought the whole ship Edwin Fox. Cf., George Blake, Gellatly´s 1862-1962: a short history of the firm. Blackie, 1962. Items in Janus/Jardine-Matheson archive online.

Re ship Middlesex, owned Dunbar, brokered by Lachlans and Co., Commenced 1 May 1939, 200 male convicts, sailed 6 July 1839, arrived 25 January 1840.

Owner of convict transport Isabella, 579 tons of 1841, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 4 November, 300 male convicts, sailed 20 January 1842 and arrived unknown.

Owner of convict transport Duchess of Northumberland of 1842, 541 tons, brokered by Dunbar. Commenced 18 August, 270 male convicts. Sailed 2 October, arrived 18 January 1843.

Owner of convict transport Earl Grey, 571 tons, of 1842, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 18 August, 26 male convicts. Sailed 5 October, arrived 14 January 1843.

Owner of convict transport Cressy 630 tons of 1843, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 21 February, 296 male convicts, sailed 30 April, arrived 20 August 1843.

Owner of convict transport Agincourt 541 tons of 1844 brokered by Dunbar. Commenced 21 May for 224 male convicts. Sailed 8 July and arrived 9 November 1844.

Owner of convict transport Phoebe, 473 tons of 1844, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 19 August for 128 female convicts and 28 children. Sailed 25 September and arrived 2 January 1845

Owner of convict transport Hydrabad, 602 tons of 1844, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 30 August for 250 male convicts. Sailed 17 October and arrived 19 February 1845

Owner of convict transport China, 524 tons of 1845, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 5 February for 200 male convicts. Sailed 27 March and arrived 4 June 1845 to Bermuda not Australia.

Owner of convict transport China, 524 tons of 1845, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 5 November for 200 male convicts. Sailed 6 January 1846 and arrived not reported and final account never received. Destination not given.

Owner of convict transport David Malcom, 488 tons of 1845, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 27 March 1845 for 220 male convicts. Sailed 16 May 1845 and arrived 25 August 1845.

On Osbert Forsyth. More to come.

In 1834, Joseph Lachlan, contract for Amphitrite.


Below are items still uncollected

Labyrinth

For so far minimal information see Dan Byrnes´s production, The Blackheath Connection.

James Smith

James Smith. Still a problem person for research by October 2012.

There was a firm Bell and Wilkinson at 53 Old Broad Street.

Labyrinth

Postscript by the 1860s: Part of the back-story and a matter Bateson overlooked is the role of Lachlans and Co., a firm of London shipbrokers who regularly took contracts to transport convicts to Australia on behalf of shipowners or other ship brokers from before 1820 to 1846 if not later. Just who Lachlans and Co. were is still not clear. The firm appears to have been operated by Joseph Lachlan The Elder and Joseph Lachlan the Younger. Just how many contracts they took to transport convicts is still not known. Just why and how government officials allowed them to operate as they did is still not known.

Year 1835

(See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices.)

Year 1836

In 1836 John Barry sent transport John Barry Captain John Robson. Mangles sent transport Surrey I (9). Transport Thomas Harrison seemed to have been owned by her master, Thomas O. Harrison. Transport Earl Grey (1) was sent by Dunbar. (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices.)

a

Year 1837

In 1837 transport Mangles (8) was sent out by Carr. (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices.)

Year 1838

In 1838 transport Emma Eugenia was probably sent by Somes (?). Earl Grey (2) was sent by Dunbar. (See Bateson, Convict Ships, Appendices.)

Year 1839

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W. Carr

W. Carr: Owner and broker for convict transport Mangles of 1839. Commenced 26 September, 290 male convicts, sailed 27 November and arrived 27 April 1840.

20 February 1839: Re ship Egyptian of 1839, brokered by H&C Toulmin, 359 tons, Commenced 20 Feb 1839, 190 male convicts, sailed 10 April 1839, arrived 15 August 1839.

Richardson, owner of convict transport Hindostan of 1839, 452 tons, brokered by Chapman. Commenced 20 February, 150 female convicts and 20 children, sailed 9 May 1839, arrived 11 September 1839.

Richardson, owner of convict transport Hindostan of 1840, 424 tons, brokered by Chapman. Commenced 13 August 1840, 209 male convicts. Sailed 7 October 1840, arrived 17 January 1841. Otherwise, still a problem person for research by October 2012.

M. Richardson: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

On Christopher Richardson. More to come.

20 March 1839: Brown 1839: Re ship Blenheim 374 tons owned by Brown, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 20 March 1839, 200 male convicts, sailed 19 May 1839 arrived 27 September 1939.

27 June 1839: Anderson, possibly of London. Re convict transport Minerva of 1839. Brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced on 27 June, 188 female convicts, Sailed 18 August and arrived 26 December 1839. Several ships had this name and can be easily confused. One website suggests that Minerva was launched from the yard of Mr Brockbank at Lancaster in Juluy 1805, of 551 tons, had piercings for 50 guns, meant for Jamaica and Clyde trade, but probably not the ship of 1939. Was bought by London owners and had voyages 1811-1813 to Bengal with Capt. John Anderson. Was used as a privateer during Napoleonic Wars. Took convicts to Australia with Captain John Bell 1818, 1819, 1821 (then owned by S. Donaldson but possibly Aberdeen built) then for New Zealand, and in 1824 (then owned by S. Donaldson).

Anderson

29 July 1839 Pirie and Co., owner of convict transport Canton of 1839, 506 tons, brokered by Pirie and Co. Commenced 29 July 1839, 240 male convicts. Sailed 22 September 1839, arrived 12 Jan 1840.

13 August 1839: Tebbut and Co., (perhaps of Sunderland?) owner of convict transport Woodbridge of 1839, 516 tons, brokered by Barber. Commenced 13 August 1839, 230 male convicts. Sailed 12 October 1839, arrived 26 February 1840. See Warren Register of Colonial Tall Ships. Woodbridge was built in 1809 at Calcutta and was owned by Tebbut and Co., registered at London. Mostly on London -Adelaide service

Tebbut and Co.

Tebbut and Co., owner of convict transport Woodbridge of 1839, 516 tons, brokered by Barber. Commenced 13 August 1839, 230 male convicts. Sailed 12 October 1839, arrived 26 February 1840. Otherwise, still a problem person for research by October 2012.

Tebbut and Co., owner of convict transport Woodbridge of 1843, 516 tons, brokered by Tebbut and Co. Commenced 27 June 1843, 204 female convicts. Sailed 30 August 1843, arrived 25 December 1843.

Tebbut: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

Barber

Barber: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

26 September 1839: W. Carr: Owner and broker for convict transport Mangles of 1839. Commenced 26 September, 290 male convicts, sailed 27 November and arrived 27 April 1840.

7 September 1839: Pirie and Co., owner of convict transport Augusta Jessie of 1839, 380 tons, brokered by Pirie and Co. Commenced 7 September 1839, 155 male convicts. Sailed 11 November 1839, arrived 25 February 1840.

26 September 1839 Alexander Greig. Owner of convict transport Runnymede 388 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 26 September, 200 male convicts, sailed 14 November, arrived 28 March 1840. Also re transport Surry of 1840 brokered by Lachlans. Also re Garland Grove of 1841 brokered by Lachlans.

Alexander Greig

Alexander Greig. Owner of convict transport Runnymede 388 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 26 September, 200 male convicts, sailed 14 November, arrived 28 March 1840. Also re transport Surry of 1840 brokered by Lachlans. Also re Garland Grove of 1841 brokered by Lachlans.

Owner of convict transport Garland Grove of 1842, 385 tons, brokered by Greig. Commenced 11 June, 256 male convicts. Sailed 28 September, arrived 20 January 1843.

Owner of convict transport Surry of 1842, brokered by Greig. Commenced 28 January 1842, 250 male convicts, Sailed 22 March, arrived 11 August.

Pathway to convict contractor Alexander Greig - little information so far. See also re Alexander Mount Greig, ditto, still a problem person for research by October 2012. (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

Henderson: Owner of convict transport Gilbert Henderson Captain J. Tweedie of 1839. 517 tons, built at Sunderland in 1837. Brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 3 October, 184 female convicts and 19 children. Sailed 12 December, arrived 24 April 1840. Otherwise, Still a problem person for research by October 2012. Captain Tweedie once sailed Medora.

On Henderson

7 December 1839: Nelson, owner of convict transport Isabella of 1839, 506 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 7 December 1839, 119 female convicts and 25 children. Sailed 5 March 1840, arrived 24 July 1840.

Nelson

Nelson, owner of convict transport Isabella of 1839, 506 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 7 December 1839, 119 female convicts and 25 children. Sailed 5 March 1840, arrived 24 July 1840. Otherwise still a problem person for research by October 2012.

Nelson: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

Brown

Re ship Blenheim, 374 tons owned by Brown, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 20 March 1839, 200 male convicts, sailed 19 May 1839 arrived 27 September 1939.

Brown: Ship Blenheim Capt Moses Campbell apparently left London 25 August 1840 for Port Nicholason, NZ with free settlers, possibly under auspices of New Zealand Co. Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

1840-1850

According to Bateson, The Convict Ships, and various other sources, from 1840 to 1850, active convict contractor names sending convicts to Australia included: Somes. Dunbar. Ellice, Kinnear and Pirie. W. L. Pope and Pirie.

On W. L. Pope

W. L. Pope, owner of convict transport Marion of 1843, 684 tons, brokered by Pirie and Co. Commenced 4 October 1843, 300 male convicts. Sailed 29 November 1843, arrived 4 April 1843. Otherwise still a problem person for research by October 2012.

W. L. Pope, captain and perhaps owner of convict transport Marion of 1845, 685 tons, brokered by Sir J. Pirie and Co. Commenced 6 May 1845, 300 male convicts. Sailed 12 June, 1845, arrived 16 September 1845.

W. L. Pope, owner of convict transport Sea Queen of 1846, 404 tons, brokered by Sir J. Pirie and Co. Commenced 26 March 1846, 170 female convicts. Sailed 11 May 1846, arrived not given (destination not stated).

W. L. Pope: In 1829 W. L. Pope was captain of ship George Green to Madras and Bengal, she had been built at Newcastle. He had or was on a ship to Calcutta in 1834 according to a Lloyd´s Register item online. Was once associated with a ship Lady McNaghten. Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

Year 1840

Disembarking at an Australian port

17 January 1840: Convict contractor Gordon and Sons - little information so far. Re convict transport Mandarin 424 tons of 1840. Commenced 17 January, 212 male convicts, sailed 25 February, arrived 30 June. (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

Gordon and Sons

Pathway to convict contractor Gordon and Sons - little information so far. Re convict transport Mandarin 424 tons of 1840. Commenced 17 January, 212 male convicts, sailed 25 February, arrived 30 June. Otherwise still a problem firm for research by 2012. (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

27 February 1840: Brass: Re convict transport King William 380 tons, of 1840. Brokered by Toulmin. Commenced 27 February, 180 make convicts. Sailed, 28 April, arrived Australia in 17 August.

Brass and Stanes

The firm was known in London as Brass and Stanes: The firm's principals both headed large families, the Stanes family began to loom large in coffee then in tea production in India to 1886. The shipping firm was composed mainly of James Stanes and his son-in-law William Brass. The Brass family tended to base in Bristol but had intermarried with Stanes. Elizabeth Stanes (1803-1855) had married William Brass of Bristol and had nine or so children. Elizabeth was daughter of James Richford Stanes (1770-1846 son of James Stanes and Sarah Cannon) and Jane Unknown. James Richford had five known children, including Elizabeth and London shipowner James Stanes (1796-1880) who married Sarah Poultney Worth (1806-1843), who had 10 children including several coffee/tea planters in India. Genealogical data on these Brass and Stanes families is available on the Internet.

Brass: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

5 March 1840: 23 September 1842: Harrison, not necessarily Benjamin. Re convict transport Margaret of 1840. Commenced 5 March, 131 female convicts and 21 children. Sailed 30 April, arrived 17 August. Margaret was used again in 1842, owned and brokered by B. Harrison, 364 tons, Commenced 23 September 1842, 156 female convicts and 20 children. Sailed 30 December and arrived 19 July 1843.

Benjamin Harrison

Harrison, not necessarily Benjamin. Re convict transport Margaret of 1840. Commenced 5 March, 131 female convicts and 21 children. Sailed 30 April, arrived 17 August. Margaret was used again in 1842, owned and brokered by B. Harrison, 364 tons, Commenced 23 September, 156 female convicts and 20 children. Sailed 30 December and arrived 19 July 1843. Otherwise, still a problem person for research by October 2012.

30 April 1840: Petman, owner of convict transport Pekoe of 1840, 378 tons, brokered by Phillipps and Co. Commenced 30 April 1840, 180 male convicts. Sailed 10 July 1840, arrived 6 November 1840. Otherwise still a problem person for research by October 2012.

On Petman

Petman: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

13 August 1840: Ward, owner of convict transport Navarino of 1840, 463 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 13 August 1840, 180 female convicts and 12 children. Sailed 8 October 1840, arrived 17 January 1841.

13 August 1840: Richardson, owner of convict transport Hindostan of 1840, 424 tons, brokered by Chapman. Commenced 13 August 1840, 209 male convicts. Sailed 7 October 1840, arrived 17 January 1841.

14 September 1840: W. L. Oldfield: Re convict ship Lady Raffles of 1840. Brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 14 September 1840, 330 male convicts. Sailed 2 December, arrived 17 March 1841.

3 October 1840: Beech: Re convict transport British Sovereign of 1840. Commenced 3 October, 180 male convicts. Sailed 16 December, arrived 18 March 1841.

8 October 1840: Aikin, probably of London. Re Ship Duncan of 1840. Brokered by Smith. Commenced 8 October, 259 Male convicts. Sailed 12 December, arrived 18 April 1841.

Aikin

Aikin, probably of London. Re Ship Duncan of 1840. Brokered by Smith. Commenced 8 October, 259 Male convicts. Sailed 12 December, arrived 18 April 1841.

Beech

Beech: Re convict transport British Sovereign of 1840. Commenced 3 October, 180 male convicts. Sailed 16 December, arrived 18 March 1841. Otherwise remains a problem person for research.

Beech: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

Convict Contractor Thomas Ward (died 1847), Wharfinger of Ratcliffe. Once the owner of ships Mangles. He possibly had a brother William, as Oxley once dealt with Thomas and William Ward in London. (See Broeze on Brooks, p. 62ff.) See AGE Jones on Daniel Bennett, whaler. Re the ship Mangles, from a website based on Bateson, we find that her slowest passages were made in 1822, under Captain Cogill/Coghill, and in 1840, under Captain Carr. On the first, she called at Rio, from which port she recorded a passage of 68 days to Port Jackson, which was rather better than average. In 1840 she put into the Cape, presumably because of an outbreak of scurvy among her prisoners, and her passage of 57 days from the Cape to Port Jackson was only fair. By then, however, her bottom was probably foul, and she was nearing the end of her long career. Carr died in 1841, and the Mangles passed into the ownership of the Ratcliffe shipowner, Thomas Ward. He transferred her to a Kingston-upon-Hull shipbuilder, Thomas Humphrey the elder, the following year, and when the latter went bankrupt the same year, the Mangles passed into the hands of a firm of Hull bankers, Pease and Liddells, in 1845. She was broken up that year.

Thomas Ward genealogy. Thomas was possibly son of a Wapping shipbuilder Luke Ward. Thomas was of Heath House, Commercial Road, Midx. He married Anne ELizabeth Middleton and had a daughter Elizabeth Middleton Ward who married Captain Lane of 17th Lancers.

This file remains Work-in-Progress

From a website, RobertsofRatcliffe: blogspot.com.au, by Anon (seems to be in German, or to receive comments in German)-
Did George Charles work for the mast-maker and ship-builder Thomas Ward ? In July 1827 George Charles Roberts took out an insurance policy with the Sun Fire Office to protect his household belongings.The address given was 15 Bridge House Place, Newington Causeway and it says the other occupier was a sawmaker. In May 1828 (also 1836)at the same address are Thomas Ward and his partner John Milner,who were mast-makers and ships chandlers mainly based at Cock Hill, Ratcliffe). On the 1830 Greenwood Map of London, I can see a Timber Yard at Bridge House Place, did that yard belong to Thomas Ward and was that where his masts were actually made ? ie., the saw-maker probably came in handy ... Did George Charles work for Thomas Ward after his apprenticeship? What is interesting is that John Roberts (1784-1860) was connected to Thomas Ward because they were trustees of the Commercial Road Trust. Were the Roberts connected to Thomas Ward? I have been trying to find out more about Thomas Ward because if it is the same man, (which I am not 100 per cent sure), he became quite an important ship builder, responsible for building many of the convict ships that were used, for instance to send convicts to Western Australia (where I was born !). It has proved difficult though, unfortunately no-one seems to have written much about him - I am hoping some-one will be able to tell me more about him .... He seems to have been born around the time of my John Roberts (1773-1847) probably 1772. I think he might have been the son of Luke Ward, who was also a ship-builder at Wapping. He was apprenticed to John Camper, a shipwright in 1790. In 1803 he became a member of the Lloyd's Society (ie. shipbuilders society). He married Ann Elizabeth Middleton at St. Anne's, Limehouse in 1820 and had only one child that I can see, Elizabeth Middleton Ward, who married very well later to the Lane family and is mentioned in Debrett's. Thomas Ward became a JP in 1828 and ended his days at Heath House on Commercial Road. He died in 1847 and was buried (appropriately) at St. Dunstans, Stepney.

Migrant shipping 1836: The 1836 ship for Western Australia Cygnet was teak-built in India in 1827, later bought by Thomas Ward and seemingly owned by him in 1836.

On W. L. Oldfield

W. L. Oldfield: Re convict ship Lady Raffles of 1840. Brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 14 September, 330 male convicts. Sailed 2 December, arrived 17 March 1841. Otherwise still a problem person for research by October 2012.

Owner of convict transport Asia of 1841, 523 tons. Brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 5 February 1841, 260 male convicts. Sailed 16 April 1841, arrived 21 July, 1841.

Owner of convict transport Asia of 1845. Brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 10 October, 150 male convicts. Sailed 10 November, arrived 5 December to Gibraltar, not Australia.

Owner of convict transport Elphinstone of 1842, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 9 April, 230 male convicts. Sailed 9 April, arrived 28 July.

Godwin and Lee

Godwin and Lee. Owner of convict transport Lord Goderick, 361 tons, of 1841. Brokered by Godwin. Commenced 17 May, 186 male convicts. Sailed 29 June, arrived 18 November 1841.

Owner of convict transport John Renwick of 1842, 402 tons, brokered by Godwin. Commenced 23 September, 156 female convicts, 20 children. Sailed 30 December, arrived 19 July 1843.

Year 1841

Aaron Chapman

Chapman. Owner of convict transport Waverley of 1841. Brokered by Chapman. Commenced 18 February, 176 male convicts and two children. Sailed 25 June and arrived 12 September.

Chapman, Owner of convict transport Somersetshire, 449 tons of 1841, brokered by Chapman. Commenced 30 September, 219 male convicts, sailed 20 December, arrived 30 May 1842

Chapman, owner of convict transport Waverley of 1842, 362 tons, brokered by Chapman. Commenced 21 July. Sailed 4 September, arrived 16 December 1842.

Aaron Chapman (1771-1850) also of Hudson´s Bay Co., who married Elizabeth Barker of Whitby. He was son7 of John Chapman of Whitby (1732-1822) and Jane Mellar. He was a convict contractor with his name noted in Shelton's Contracts as above. (See Burke's Landed Gentry for Chapman. Byrnes, The Blackheath Connection, p. 97.) He was of Highbury Park, Midx, JP, MP for Whitby 1832-1847, Elder Brother of Trinity House in 1809, Director Hudson's Bay Co., of London Assurance Office. (Google Docs pdf 96 pp downloaded 21-12-2010 on Descendants of Robert Chapman by Charles E. G. Pease kinlochhotel@btinternet.com.)

This file remains Work-in-Progress

Abel II Chapman (1752-1849). Son of Abel I Chapman (1694-1777) and his third wife Hannah Gaskin (1517-1705). Abel II´s first wife was Rebecca Bell (d.1825). Abel II had a son William Chapman (1792-1878 who married his cousin Jane Chapman) who was a banker with Herries-Farquhar and an investor in the Australian Agricultural Co.

Abel III Chapman (1758-1852) - More to come

Disembarking at an Australian port

There was a marriage between Arthur Wakefield Chapman (1849-1901) of this Chapman family and Agnes Mangles (born 1850) who was also from a convict contracting family.

On convict contractor John Chapman. Probably an active London shipping agent of the 1830s. More to come.

Smith (probably J. Smith of Leith), owner of convict transport Rajah of 1841, 352 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Captain Charles Ferguson. Commenced 4 February 1841, 180 female convicts. Sailed 5 April 1841, arrived not reported. Still a problem person for research by October 2012. Rajah a barque was built at Whitby in 1835 (Noted in Warren Register of Colonial Tall Ships). See also Ronald Parsons, Migrant Ships for South Australia, 1836-1860. Gumeracha South Australia, Gould Books, 1988.

Smith

Smith: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

5 February 1841: Owner of convict transport Asia of 1841, 523 tons. Brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 5 February 1841, 260 male convicts. Sailed 16 April 1841, arrived 21 July, 1841.

Aaron Chapman

18 February 1841: Chapman. Owner of convict transport Waverley of 1841. Brokered by Chapman. Commenced 18 February, 176 male convicts and two children. Sailed 25 June and arrived 12 September.

25 March 1841: Bottomley [William?], owner of convict transport Westmoreland of 1841. Brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 25 March, 202 male convicts. Sailed 19 May, arrived 12 September. Bottomley may have been a shipbuilder of this name of King´s Lynn?

30 March 1841: Russell, owner of convict transport David Clarke of 1841, 608 tons, brokered by Phillipps and Co. Commenced 30 March 1841, 308 male convicts. Sailed 6 June 1841, arrived 4 October 1841.

H. Russell

Russell, owner of convict transport David Clarke of 1841, 608 tons, brokered by Phillipps and Co. Commenced 30 March 1841, 308 male convicts. Sailed 6 June 1841, arrived 4 October 1841. Otherwise, still a problem person for research by October 2012.

H. Russell, owner of convict transport Isabella Watson of 1842, 608 tons, brokered by Edridge. Commenced 10 February 1842, 200 male convicts. Sailed 1 May 1842, arrived 3 August. Probably with the Glasgow shipbrokers Russell and Raeburn.

H. Russell: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

17 May 1841: Godwin and Lee of London. Owners of convict transport Lord Goderick Captain William Mills, 361 tons, of 1841. Brokered by Godwin. Commenced 17 May, 186 male convicts. Sailed 29 June, arrived 18 November. Lord Goderick on one of her voyages, it is not known where, was under Captain Andrew Smith

12 August 1841: G. Wade, owner of convict transport Emma Eugenia of 1841, 383 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 12 August 1841, 191 female convicts. Sailed 18 November 1841, arrived date not given. Emnma Eugenia was built in London in 1819. She was later reportedly at Penang and Cape.

On Giles Wade

G. Wade, captain or owner of convict transport Emma Eugenia of 1841, 383 tons, brokered by Lachlans and Co. Commenced 12 December 1845, 170 female convicts. Sailed 24 January 1846, arrived, not given.

This file remains Work-in-Progress

Captain Giles Wade of Stepney Green once sailed Layton 513 tons a ship built at Lancaster in 1814 at Brockbanks´ yard and launched 28 October 1814, 498 tons and meant for the Jamaica trade, Captain Atkinson, first owned by John Brockbank. Layton was later in trade to India with probably a different owner, L. Somes. By 1826 was used maybe as a troop transport, then in 1827 a convict transport. Layton Capt. Luscombe left Portsmouth on 4 June 1827 for VDL. She had more voyages with convicts in 1829 and 1831. By 19 August 1833 (Morning Chronicle) Capt Giles Wade aboard Layton took on board 250 free females, the ship chartered by the Emigration Committee. Layton made more voyages with convicts in 1835, 1837 and 1841. Her career ended working in the guano trade. She disappeared from records by 1847. Giles Wade possibly had a partner, William Campbell of Woodford Essex. Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

3 September 1841: D. Halket, owner of convict transport Richard Webb 403 tons of 1841. Brokered by Halket. Commenced 3 September, 200 male convicts. Sailed 15 November, arrived 4 March 1842. Owner of convict transport John Brewer 457 tons of 1841. Brokered by Pirie and Co. Commenced 30 September, 200 make convicts. Sailed 5 December, arrived 6 April 1842.

On David Halket

This file remains Work-in-Progress

David Halket, owner of convict transport Richard Webb 403 tons of 1841. Brokered by Halket. Commenced 3 September, 200 male convicts. Sailed 15 November, arrived 4 March 1842. Owner of convict transport John Brewer 457 tons of 1841. Brokered by Pirie and Co. Commenced 30 September, 200 make convicts. Sailed 5 December, arrived 6 April 1842.

Owner of convict transport Emily, 448 tons of 1844, brokered by Halket. Commenced 16 May for 205 male convicts. Sailed 14 July and arrived 30 October 1844.

David Halket: Died 1864. Husband to Mary Webb who had three children. He may also have been of Gresham Place, Newcastle. He possibly bankrupted in 1855? Born in Perth Scotland in 1792, a patent nail manufacturer, insurance broker, ship owner. In 1841 of London Street, Fenchurch Street. He was possibly a link to a migrant ship to California, re ship Walter Morrice. Report on a case argued, about 137 pounds, a Bill for, Halket was agent for ship Countess of Dunmore to Rio de Janeiro, a matter disputed by shipbrokers Hudson, Weguellen and Co., nd? At some time is link (UK archives webpage) re mines in England with Thomas Nichols iron founders, Josiah Hugo Hitchins mine agent and John Metherell mine agent, all of Tavistock. An 1827 directory of Liverpool gives a timber merchant David Halket of 35 Grafton Street. The convic t transport Richard Webb was named for his father-in-law. Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

Year 1842

A. Redley

A. Redley, owner of convict transport Candahar of 1842, 506 tons, brokered by Toulmin. Commenced 28 January 1842, 250 male convicts. Sailed 2 April 1842, arrived 21 July 1842. Otherwise, still a problem person for research by October 2012.

A. Redley: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

28 January 1842: Owner of convict transport Surry of 1842, brokered by Greig. Commenced 28 January 1842, 250 male convicts, Sailed 22 March, arrived 11 August.

28 January 1842: Owner of convict transport Royal Admiral of 1842, 441 tons, brokered by Bottomley. Commenced 28 January 1842, sailed 204 female convicts, no children, sailed 5 May, arrived 26 September 1842.

14 March 1842: John Henry Luscombe: Owner of convict transport Eden, 522 tons of 1842. Brokered by Luscombe. Commenced 28 January, 280 male convicts, sailed 14 March, arrived 6 July 1842.

John Henry Luscombe (1797-1883) of The Grove, Church Road, Upper Norwood, South London. Married to Clara Bristow and employed her brother Frank Bristow as ships captain. Owner of convict ship Norwood. Largely known as two of his sons were famous UK footballers. He married at age 50. Had ships to New Zealand in the 1850s. He employed his wife´s brother 1856-1870 Captain Bristow, mostly on ship Norwood, which eg., carried convicts to Western Australia, in 1860 she was chartered to carry soldiers to the Maori Wars, New Zealand. Norwood was later sold to H. Wake of London then to J. Bonus and Sons of London. (Pathways through the Labyrinth

John Henry Luscombe

This file remains Work-in-Progress

Owner of convict transport Eden, 522 tons of 1842. Brokered by Luscombe. Commenced 28 January, 280 male convicts, sailed 14 March, arrived 6 July 1842.

Pathway to convict contractor John Henry Luscombe (1797-1883) of The Grove, Church Road, Upper Norwood, South London. Married to Clara Bristow and employed her brother Frank Bristow as ships captain. Owner of convict ship Norwood. Largely known as two of his sons were famous UK footballers. He married at age 50. Had ships to New Zealand in the 1850s. He employed his wife´s brother 1856-1870 Captain Bristow, mostly on ship Norwood, which eg., carried convicts to Western Australia, in 1860 she was chartered to carry solders to the Maori Wars, New Zealand. Norwood was later sold to H. Wake of London then to J. Bonus and Sons of London. (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

3 February 1842: L. M. Lugrhue: Owner of convict transport Hope 377 tons of 1842. Brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 3 February, 139 male convicts. Sailed 9 April and arrived 17 August 1842.

10 February 1842: H. Russell, owner of convict transport Isabella Watson of 1842, 608 tons, brokered by Edridge. Commenced 10 February 1842, 200 male convicts. Sailed 1 May 1842, arrived 3 August.

23 February 1842: Ward, owner of convict transport Susan of 1842, 572 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 23 February 1842, 300 male convicts. Sailed 24 April 1842, arrived 24 July 1842.

9 April 1842: W. L. Oldfield. Owner of convict transport Elphinstone of 1842, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 9 April, 230 male convicts. Sailed 9 April, arrived 28 July.

18 April 1842: 1842: T. Brockelbank. Owner of convict transport Waterloo of 1842, brokers by Lachlans. Commenced 18 April, 220 male convicts. Sailed 1 June, wrecked Table Bay 28 August 1842.

Brockelbank

Owner of convict transport Waterloo of 1842, brokers by Lachlans. Commenced 18 April, 220 male convicts. Sailed 1 June, wrecked Table Bay 28 August 1842.

Brockelbank: This name was from the London family, not to be confused with the Brocklebank shipping line family of Whitehaven, then Liverpool, which spelled its name Brocklebank, the two families were quite distinct.

This file remains Work-in-Progress

On George Kinnear

London convict contractor George Kinnear - probably of the firm Ellice-Kinnear of 145 Shaft Alley, London. George Kinnear was associated in 1842 with the convict transport Kinnear from TheShipsList website on Vessels Carrying Convicts From Great Britain, 1839-1846. Otherwise, still a problem person for research by April 2012.

Ellice/Kinnear/George Kinnear, Owner of convict transport Kinnear, brokered by Pirie and Co. Commenced 30 April, 174 male convicts. Commenced 10 July, arrived 23 October 1842.

Extra information: 30 April 1842: Ellice Kinnear, Owner of convict transport Kinnear, brokered by Pirie and Co. Commenced 30 April, 174 male convicts. Commenced 10 July, arrived 23 October 1842.

Item: London newspaper notice of dissolving of partnership, trading as Ellice Kinnear and Co., 27 March 1844, of Russell Ellice, George Kinnear, George Forsyth, William Ellice and Robert Ellice of Leadenhall Street. There was evidently a continuation, as a notice arose dated 31 December 1853 re the dissolution of the partnership of George Forsyth, George Kinnear, William Ellice and Russell Ellice.

This file remains Work-in-Progress

Follows an impression of the relevant Ellice genealogy

Descendants of Ellice George
1. Ellice George (d.1736) sp: Barclay Isobel
2. Miller or fur trader of New York Ellice Alexander sp: Of Gartly, Scotland Simpson Mary
3. Hudson Bay Co, Loyalist fur trader of Montreal Ellice Alexander of New York (b.1743;d.1805) sp: Russell Anne Ann (m.1780)
4. Rt Hon MP Ellice Edward "Bear" (b.1781;d.1863) sp: Lady, wife2 Keppel Anne Amelia (b.1803;m.1843;d.1843) sp: wife1 Grey Hannah Althea (d.1832)
5. MP Ellice Edward The Younger (b.1810;d.1880) sp: wife1 Balfour Catherine Jane (d.1864) sp: widow Hagart Eliza Stewart
4. General, Gov Malta Ellice Robert-15469 (b.1784;d.1856) sp: Grey Eliza Courtney-64648 (b.1792;d.1859)
5. Ellice Georgiana-30273 sp: Seymour Hugh Horatio-37974 (m.1846)
6. Barrister Seymour Hugh Francis-25204 (b.1855) sp: Lascelles Rachel Blanche-90615 (m.1884)
5. Ellice Eliza-45083 (b.1818;d.1899) sp: Lord 23 Dacre, Visc1 Hampden of Glynde Brand Henry Bouverie William-45082 (b.1814;d.1892)
6. Hon Brand Alice-45077 (d.1925) sp: Sir Bart4 Farquhar Henry Thomas (b.1838;m.1862;d.1916)
7. Major DSO Farquhar Francis Douglas (b.1874;d.1915) sp: Lady Waiting Hely-Hutchinson Evelyn (m.1905)
8. Farquhar Norah Frances Sapphire sp: Oliver Mark of Scots Guards (m.1925)
8. wife3 Farquhar Sybil Barbara (d.1909) sp: Grant Charles Robert Archibald (b.1903;d.1972) sp: Lt-Cmndr Combe Anthony Boyce (b.1914)
7. Farquhar Katherine (d.1933) sp: Sir Fitzroy Almeric William (b.1851;d.1935)
8. Fitzroy Nigel Horatio Trevor (b.1889;d.1953) sp: Pery-Knox-Gore Diana Frances
9. Fitzroy Susanna Diana Georgina (b.1937) sp: Coleridge William Anthony sp: Peter-Hoblyn George Henry (b.1943) sp: Paul Constance
8. Fitzroy Yvonne Alice Gertrude (b.1891;d.1971)
6. Gov NSW, Visc2 Hampden, Lord Dacre Brand Henry Robert (b.1841;d.1906) sp: wife1 Van de Weyer Victoria Alexandrina Leopoldine (m.1864;d.1865) sp: Wife2 Cavendish Susan Henrietta (b.1846;m.1868;d.1909)
7. Lt-Colonel Viscount3 Hampden Brand Thomas Walter (b.1869;d.1958) sp: Montagu-Douglas-Scott Katherine Mary (b.1875;m.1899)
8. Viscount4 Hampden Banker Brand Thomas Henry (b.1900;d.1965) sp: Seely Leila Emily (d.1996)
9. Baroness Dacre Brand Rachel Leila (b.1929) sp: Hon Home William Douglas-Home (b.1912)
10. Hon Home James Thomas Douglas-Home (b.1952) sp: Stephenson Christine
8. Brand Joan Louisa (b.1904;d.1996) sp: Sir Bart2 Hill-Wood Basil Samuel Hill (b.1900;d.1954)
8. Viscount5 Hampden Brand David Francis (b.1902;d.1975) sp: Hon Rice Imogen Alice Rhys (b.1903)
9. Viscount6 Hampden Brand Anthony David (b.1937) sp: Proby Caroline
7. Brand Margaret (b.1873;d.1948) sp: Brig-General Ferguson Algernon Francis Holford (b.1867;m.1897;d.1943)
8. Major Ferguson Andrew (b.1899;d.1966) sp: Montagu-Douglas-Scott Marian Scott (b.1908;d.1996)
9. Died young Ferguson John Andrew 9. Major Ferguson Ronald Ivor (b.1931;d.2003) sp: Wright Susan Mary (b.1937;d.1998)
10. Ferguson Jane Louisa (b.1957) sp: Australia, Farmer, Moree area Makim Alex (b.1951;m.1976(Div))
11. Makim Ayesha (b.1986) 11. Surf filmmaker Australia Makim Seamus (b.1980)
10. Duchess York Ferguson Sarah Margaret "Fergie" (b.1959) sp: Prince Windsor Andrew Albert Duke of York (b.1960)
11. Princess Windsor Eugenie Victoria Helena (b.1990) 11. Windsor Beatrice Elizabeth Mary (b.1988) sp: wife2 Deptford Susan
10. Ferguson Alice sp: Banker Stileman Nick (m.2010)
8. Ferguson Jane Charlotte (b.1912) sp: Sir Fellowes William Albemarle (b.1899;d.1964) 9. Sir, Royal staff, Banker Fellowes Robert (b.1941) sp: Hon Spencer Jane (m.1978)
10. Fellowes Laura Jane (b.1980)
7. Baron Brand Brand Robert Henry (b.1878;d.1963) sp: Langhorne Phyllis (b.1902;d.1937)
7. Brand Dorothy Louisa (d.1958) sp: Major Feilden Percy Henry Guy (b.1870;d.1944)
8. Major-General Feilden Randle Guy (b.1904;d.1981) sp: Ramsden Mary Joyce
9. Feilden Randle Joseph (b.1931;d.2004) sp: Lady Wood Caroline Victoria
10. Feilden Fiona Caroline (b.1965) sp: Bryant James D. E.
9. Feilden Andrew James (b.1941) sp: Brassey Rowena Jane
8. Feilden Dorothy Priscilla (b.1909) 8. Major Feilden Cecil Henry (b.1907;d.1983) sp: Baring Olivia Constance Leonora (b.1908;m.1941)
6. Brand Maud Elizabeth (d.1944) sp: Bevan David Augustus (b.1856;d.1937)
7. Colonel Bevan John Henry sp: Bingham Barbara Violet (b.1902;m.1927)
8. Bevan Jennifer Jane (b.1927) sp: Lowther John Luke 8. Bevan Marion 8. Bevan Julian Charles (b.1929)
7. Bevan Maurice (b.1886) sp: Ponsonby Joan
8. Bevan Susan Hermione (b.1921) 8. Bevan Oliver Dermot (b.1918) 8. Bevan Elizabeth Anne (b.1916) 8. Major Bevan David Gerald (b.1915)
6. Brand Mabel sp: Thomas Frederick Freeman
7. Thomas Florence sp: Hon Brookes Marshall Jones (d.1944)
8. Brooks Dorothy sp: Major Gregory-Hood Charles Hugh Hood
9. Gregory-Hood Alexander Marshall sp: Gilmour Diana
10. Gregory-Hood Peter Charles Freeman
6. Brand Gertrude sp: Colonel 53rd Regt Campion William Henry (b.1836;d.1923)
7. Sir Gov WA Campion William Robert (b.1870;d.1951) sp: Byron Katherine Mary (m.1894;d.1951)
8. Campion Dorothy May sp: Earl12 Northesk Carnegie John Dougals (b.1895;d.1975)
9. Carnegie Mary Elizabeth (b.1921) 9. Carnegie David John (b.1922;d.1942) 9. Earl13 Northesk Carnegie Robert Andrew (b.1926;d.1994) 9. Carnegie Susan Jean (b.1930) 8. Campion Barbara sp: Fleming Edward Charles Augustus (b.1903) 9. Fleming Thomas Charles (b.1925) 9. Fleming Michael Edward (b.1927) 8. Campion William Simon (b.1895) sp: Poeteous Lilas May 9. Campion William David Simon (b.1922) 8. Campion Wilfred Edward (b.1899) sp: Sarrell Nieza
9. Campion Edward (b.1934)
7. Rev Campion Frederick Henry sp: Blaxland Noel
8. Campion John Henry (b.1908)
7. Campion Alice sp: Phillimore Charles Augustus
8. Sir Phillimore Henry Josceline (b.1910) sp: Roxby Katharine Mary
9. Phillimore Sarah Susan (b.1940)
8. Phillimore Violet Alice Valentine (b.1909) sp: Major Hill Clement Walter Rowland (b.1909)
9. Hill Carolyn Mary (b.1937)
8. Phillimore Mary Harriet (b.1912) 8. RN submariner Phillimore Walter Augustus (b.1915;d.1942)
7. Campion Edward (b.1873;d.1916) 7. Campion Bridget (b.1875;d.1881) 7. Campion Charles (b.1876;d.1901) 7. Campion Mary Gertrude (b.1878) 7. Campion Joan (b.1882) sp: Captain RN Domville Archibald Compton Winnington (b.1884;d.1959)
8. Domville Margaret sp: de Vial Alfredo
7. Campion Margaret Georgiana (d.1829) sp: Captain of Invergarry Ellice Edward Charles (b.1858;d.1934)
6. Major Hon Brand Charles sp: Van De Weyer Alice Emma Sturgis (b.1926;d.1926)
7. Brand Ruth sp: Baron2 Monk Dodson John William (b.1869)
8. Hon Dodson Priscilla (b.1914) sp: Major Knight Claude Thorburn
9. Knight Caroline Jane (b.1935) sp: De Salis Jerome Otway Fane
10. De Salis Henrieta Jane
8. Baron3 Monk Bretton Dodson John Charles (b.1824)
6. wife1 Brand Mary Cecilia (b.1851;d.1886) sp: Merchant at Manila Sturgis Henry Parkman (b.1806;m.1872;d.1869)
7. Linguist Sturgis Maria Trinidad Howard (b.1846;d.1890) sp: Middlemore Samuel George Chetwynd (b.1848;d.1890) 7. Officer Rifle Brigade Sturgis Henry Russell (b.1879) 7. Sturgis Olive (b.1877) sp: Army officer Hankey George Barnard (m.1900) 7. Sturgis John Bryan (b.1881) 7. Sturgis Margery (b.1874) sp: Ellice William Henry
7. Sturgis Mary (b.1886) 7. Sturgis Rachel (b.1876) sp: Price Aubrey
7. Sturgis Frederic Russell 6. Rear-Admiral Brand Thomas Seymour (b.1847;d.1916) sp: Gaskell Annie Blanche (d.1946)
7. Captain Brand Humphrey Ranulph (b.1895;d.1953) sp: Clarke Aimee Gwendolyn
5. Ellice Robert (b.1816;d.1858) sp: Balfour Eglantine Charlotte Louisa (d.1907) 5. Rt Hon Ellice Edward (c.1823) 5. General Adjutant-General Ellice Charles Henry (b.1823;d.1888) sp: Lambton Louisa Caroline (b.1828)
6. Ellice William Henry sp: Sturgis Margery (b.1874)
4. MP for Invergarry Ellice William (b.1782;d.1822) sp: Ross Henrietta (b.1787) sp: Phyn Miss
3. Fur trader Ellice Robert (d.1790) 3. Suspected as Loyalist Ellice James (d.1787)

Disembarking at an Australian port

On George Forsyth - Convict contractor. His firm was once of 145 Shaft Alley, London. Still a problem person for research by October 2012.

21 July 1842: Chapman, owner of convict transport Waverley of 1842, 362 tons, brokered by Chapman. Commenced 21 July. Sailed 4 September, arrived 16 December 1842.

Aaron Chapman (1771-1850) also of Hudson´s Bay Co, who married Elizabeth Barker of Whitby. He was son7 of John Chapman of Whitby (1732-1822) and Jane Mellar. He was a convict contractor with his name noted in Shelton's Contracts. (See Burke's Landed Gentry for Chapman. Byrnes, The Blackheath Connection, p. 97.) He was of Highbury Park, Midx, JP, MP for Whitby 1832-1847, Elder Brother of Trinity House in 1809, Director Hudson's Bay Co., London Assurance Office. (Google Docs pdf 96 pp downloaded 21-12-2010 on Descendants of Robert Chapman by Charles E. G. Pease kinlochhotel@btinternet.com.)

Abel II Chapman (1752-1849). Son of Abel I Chapman (1694-1777) and his third wife Hannah Gaskin (1517-1705). Abel II´s first wife was Rebecca Bell (d.1825). Abel II had a son William Chapman (1792-1878 who married his cousin Jane Chapman) who was a banker with Herries-Farquhar and an investor in the Australian Agricultural Co.

Abel III Chapman (1758-1852) - More to come

(There was a marriage between Arthur Wakefield Chapman (1849-1901) of this Chapman family and Agnes Mangles (born 1850) who was also from a convict contracting family.)

11 June 1842: Nicol and Co., Owners of convict transport Triton, 467 tons, brokered by Nicol. Commenced 11 June 1842, 256 male convicts. Sailed 9 August and arrived 19 December 1842.

On John Nichols

John Nichol/Nichols: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

On Nicol and Co.

Nicol and Co., Owners of convict transport Triton, 467 tons, brokered by Nicol. Commenced 11 June, 256 male convicts. Sailed 4-9 August 1842 and arrived 19 December 1842. Otherwise still a problem person for research by October 2012.

11 June 1842: Greig: Owner of convict transport Garland Grove of 1842, 385 tons, brokered by Greig. Commenced 11 June, 256 male convicts. Sailed 28 September, arrived 20 January 1843.

14 June 1842: Ward, owner of convict transport Moffatt of 1842, 821 tons, brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 14 June 1842, 389 male convicts. Sailed 14 August 1842, arrived 28 November 1842.

2 August 1842: C. M. Lughrue (LM or CM?, owner of convict transport Samuel Boddington of 523 tons of 1845. Brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 2 August, 141 male convicts. Sailed 23 September and arrived 18 January 1846.

L. M. Lughrue

Lughrue, Owner of convict transport Hope 377 tons of 1842. Brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 3 February, 139 male convicts. Sailed 9 April and arrived 17 August 1842. Still a problem person for research by October 2012.

C. M. Lughrue (LM or CM?, owner of convict transport Samuel Boddington of 523 tons of 1845. Brokered by Lachlans. Commenced 2 August, 141 male convicts. Sailed 23 September and arrived 18 January 1846.

(Was this the London name Lughrue associated with the mid-nineteenth century Thames River squads of tug-boats?)

L. M. Lughrue: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

23 September 1842: Harrison, not necessarily Benjamin. Re convict transport Margaret of 1842. Owned and brokered by B. Harrison, 364 tons, Commenced 23 September 1842, 156 female convicts and 20 children. Sailed 30 December and arrived 19 July 1843.

30 September: 1842: Chapman, Owner of convict transport Somersetshire, 449 tons of 1841, brokered by Chapman. Commenced 30 September, 219 male convicts, sailed 20 December, arrived 30 May 1842

1849: 1 May, 1849:
A. G. L. Shaw, Convicts and the Colonies, pp. 353-354), an Order-In-Council makes Western Australia/colony a place to which convicts could be sent.

1849: Closure of Ben Boyd's bank. 1849: Caroline Chisholm establishes the Family Colonisation Loan Society in London to help families emigrate - her first emigrant ship is Slain's Castle.

1849: In June 1849, Robt. Brooks actually joins the revised Southern Whale Fishery as a director In January 1849 Charles Enderby (of Blackheath) initiated with £100,000 capital the Southern Whale Fishery to operate from Auckland Islands south of NZ. Enderby himself went out to there, Port Ross. Robert Brooks is an investor, but it all liquidates in a few years; other investors are Frederic Somes, John Gilmore, shipbroker W. S. Lindsay, and shareholders include: Thomas Baring and his partner Thomas Bates, oil merchants William Beale and Elhanan Bucknell, shipowner Money Wigram, NZ shipbroker Willis. In Sydney, Robert Towns gets an agency for this South Whale Fishery Co.
(Broeze, Robert Brooks, Ch 12, p. 248.).

1849: George Marshall active in the Australian trade. By 1849 is senior partner of shipbrokers Marshall and Edridge, (PRO, BT 107ff). Marshall deals with John Gore who dies in 1849.
(Broeze, Robert Brooks, p. 346.)

On the genealogy of George Marshall, who was well-connected it seems. He was son of George Marshall of Mustoe, Co. Durham, England, and Hannah Anderson. George marshall (1802-1877) married Elizabeth Helen Gore who had about nine children, among whom were: partners with their father in his shipping firm, bachelor Walter Gore Marshall (1845=1890) owner of Hambleton Hall (on which there is a wikipedia page) and his brother George II Marshall (born 1837). Elizabeth Helen Gore was daughter of John Gore and Charlotte Goodwyn. Among her other children were Evangeline Marshall who married army Captain Clement Astley Cooper. Helena Rose Marshall who married Edward Courage. Constance Marshall who married Major-General George Henry Vesey. Elizabeth Marshall who married Friedrich Rosenthal. The Gore family is perhaps even more interesting, since among their number are included: Australia trade wool merchant, Benedict John Gore (died 1849) who had two sons as merchant in the Australia trade, Edmund Gore and Charles Gore. Benedict John's sister Emma Gore who married Benedict John Angell. Her sister Rosa Gore who married London banker Daniel Mildred (born 1795) of Masterman's Bank, London (comprised of John Masterman MP, William Peters, Daniel Mildred and John Masterman Jnr plus Frederick Mildred and Edward Masterman, a bank said to be active in the Australia trade) and once living at Paddington London. The Masterman bank stopt payment in 1866. And Claudine Marrianne Gore who married Thomas Wright Watson (born 1836) of Chigwell, scion of a considerable line of Watsons.

Edridge geneaology:


1823 ++ - Pemberton, The London Connection, p. 66; and p. 73, noting that AA Co. directors were  forbidden to have an interest in contracts let by the Company, so the Buckle firm and Stewart Marjoribanks could not let their shipping for company operations. Pike in Dissent regards Buckle on the NCS as an "exception amongst philanthropists".

By 1832 the largest London importers of Australian wool were John Gore and Co.

1834 - Bulwer is often mentioned in this capacity in Sydney Gazette issues of late 1834 and 1835. Broeze, Brooks, p. 61, regards the leading British firms in the Australian trade as John Gore and Co., Aspinall Browne and Co. at Liverpool, Buckles and Co., Walker and Co., Robert Brooks and Donaldson Wilkinson and Co., to about 1833. At Sydney was merchant Stuart Alexander Donaldson. One William Wilkinson became a pro tem secretary of the AACo.

1830s - Broeze, Brooks, p. 79: The pioneer brokers of the 1830s Australian trade were Devitt and Moore, whom Brooks used; they loaded 39 ships for Australia in 1840 at a peak for their business.

In 1826 arose a "premature" New Zealand Co. Buckle and Marjoribanks were joined by men  including Lord Durham, Colonel Torrens, Russell Ellice (later, see Kinnear Ellice and Co.).

At right: Generic image of one of the fearsome Thames River Prison Hulks of the nineteenth century. A relevant book title here is Charles Campbell, The Intolerable Hulks. By an American writer.

Generic image of a Thames River prison hulk

In 1816, Thomas Coutts and Duke of York owned by Stewart Marjoribanks. (In 1830, the British government made an examination of ships let from 1811 to the service of the East India Co. Amongst the shipowner and ship names listed, some are noted as ships carrying convicts to Australia. Follows an extraction from the list, which is on a webpage provided by www.british-history.ac.uk - an aspx-generated report.)

In 1819, Berwickshire and Hythe owned by Stewart Marjoribanks. (In 1830, the British government made an examination of ships let from 1811 to the service of the East India Co. Amongst the shipowner and ship names listed, some are noted as ships carrying convicts to Australia. Follows an extraction from the list, which is on a webpage provided by www.british-history.ac.uk - an aspx-generated report.)

In 1825 Brent owned by S. Marjoribanks and Co. (In 1830, the British government made an examination of ships let from 1811 to the service of the East India Co. Amongst the shipowner and ship names listed, some are noted as ships carrying convicts to Australia. Follows an extraction from the list, which is on a webpage provided by www.british-history.ac.uk - an aspx-generated report.)

In 1825 Henry Porcher owned by S. Marjoribanks and Co. (In 1830, the British government made an examination of ships let from 1811 to the service of the East India Co. Amongst the shipowner and ship names listed, some are noted as ships carrying convicts to Australia. Follows an extraction from the list, which is on a webpage provided by www.british-history.ac.uk - an aspx-generated report.)

In 1825 Brent owned by S. Marjoribanks and Co. (In 1830, the British government made an examination of ships let from 1811 to the service of the East India Co. Amongst the shipowner and ship names listed, some are noted as ships carrying convicts to Australia. Follows an extraction from the list, which is on a webpage provided by www.british-history.ac.uk - an aspx-generated report.)

1799++1834 - A. H. McLintock, Crown Colony Government in New Zealand. Wellington,. R. E. Owen, Government Printer, 1958., p. 33, lists members of Church Missionary society (founded 1799) as Buxton, Sir James Stephen (his father being in the Clapham Sect), Lord Bexley, Lord Glenelg, William Wilberforce. By 1834:  The Committee for Promoting Emigration of Females to Australian Colonies: Sydney Gazette, 1 November, 1834 included: Edward Forster chairman, Samuel Hoare, Charles Holt Bracebridge, Thomas Lewin, S. H. Sterry, John Abel Smith, MP, Colonel Phipps, William Crawford, Capt. Daniel Pring, RN, John Taylor, John S. Reynolds, Capel Cure (sic), Charles Lushington, George Long, John Pirie, Nader/Nadir Baxter, agent was John Marshall of 26 Birchin Lane, Cornhill. (There had been recent use of ships Layton, David Scott).

1840 - When Earl Durham died 1840, Joseph Somes, former deputy-governor stepped in as governor of the New Zealand Company. Somes was a self-made man from a family long engaged as Thames watermen and lightermen. His father was Samuel, also a coal dealer. Joseph as a lighterman bought ships and chartered them to the EICo. He built a fitting-out establishment at Poplar (near the West India Docks complex). When the EICo lost its monopoly and disposed of its ships, Somes bought many, paying  £10000-£14000 each for some. Soon he had 15-20 ships in the India trade, plus others carrying convicts, or in the China tea trade, carrying passengers to Australia and whalers sailing to the South Pacific. Somes was instrumental in  founding Lloyd's Register of Shipping, and became the largest owner of private shipping in UK. He later  stood for Parliament. Somes is seen as a self-interested philanthropist, and from his Devon constituency he sent settlers to New Plymouth. (C&C Manson, Curtain- Raiser to a Colony, on Joseph Somes, pp. 37ff, pp. 56ff.) However, on behalf of the NZ Co, Somes tried to sell the Chatam Islands, influenced by an idea from Wm. Wakefield, who sent R. D. Hanson to effect the purchase. In London, could the Chatam Islands be turned into cash? Germans agreed to pay $10,000 for the islands, although now the British Government had noticed matters, and Crown lawyers looked into legalities. Somes wrote to the Colonial Office, but the Crown thought Hanson's deal was illegal. On 10 December, 1838, Somes as director of NZ Co agreed to sell his ship Tory to the Co. for £5250. She was fitted out by Col. William Wakefield at Milwall Dock, Somes advancing much cash. In early May 1839, Somes gave a large dinner party prior for Tory's sailing. A Maori,  Nahiti, returned to New Zealand on Tory. Young Jerningham Wakefield sailed on Tory.

Colonists of South Australia: Sydney Gazette, on 4 December, 1830, noted a List of members of the National Colonization Society (NCS), chair being R. W. Horton, MP, meeting at 21 Regent Street London on 18 June, 1830: By 16 January, 1834, promoters of South Australia had begun a South Australian Church Society. (Note: Pike, Dissent, pp. 66-67.) The June 1830 committee would consist of: Horton plus Robert Gouger, secretary, W. S. O'Brien MP, Thomas Potter Macqueen MP, William Smith MP (of bankers Smiths Payne Smiths?), C. Buller MP, J. C. Hobhouse MP, Colonel Talbot MP, T. Kavanagh MP, Rev. E. T. Sampson (perhaps of a Blackheath family?), Colonel Torrens, Rev. J. Styles DD, Rev. F. A. Cox LLD, John Labouchere Esq., R. H. Innes Esq., Robert Owen (socialist), John William Buckle (convict contractor, trader), J. Stirling (of Swan River?), J. Talbot Esq., H. Elphinstone Esq., William Hutt Esq., Clayton Brown Esq., C. Tennant Esq., Robert Scott Esq. Donations went to banks Smiths Payne and Smiths, Drummonds, Hammersley and Co., Cockburn and Co. (Note on Drummonds and on Hammersley - In 1787, the royal bank account was with Coutts, but then went to the banker Hammersley. One banker Hugh Hammersley died in 1840. See Edna Healey, Coutts, p. 157, p. 294; and also F. M. L. Thompson, `life after death', p. 52.

1831: Sarah Palmer, writing on repeal of the Navigation Laws has a list, Table 7, of MPs between 1832 and 1852 with interests in shipping: Including G. Barnard a London shipbuilder of Greenwich; J. S. Brownrigg shipowner of Boston by 1825; Aaron Chapman shipowner of Whitby by 1832; J. Humphrey a wharfinger of Southwark, by 1832; George Lyall a shipowner and merchant of City of London, by 1833; J, Mangles a shipowner and ship chandler of Guildford by 1831; J. Somes a shipowner and shipbuilder of Dartmouth, by 1844; George Frederick Young, shipowner and shipbuilder of Tynemouth by 1831. Sarah Palmer, Politics, Shipping and the Repeal of the Navigation Laws. Manchester, Manchester University Press, 1990., p. 24.

Disembarking at an Australian port

In 1825 Commodore Hayes owned by George F. Young. (In 1830, the British government made an examination of ships let from 1811 to the service of the East India Co. Amongst the shipowner and ship names listed, some are noted as ships carrying convicts to Australia. Follows an extraction from the list, which is on a webpage provided by www.british-history.ac.uk - an aspx-generated report.)

1833: In 1833 Gore gets Australian wool on ship Caroline Capt Treadwell. In Sydney, Dacre uses legal services of W. C. Wentworth. In 1833, the leading British firms in Australian trade are John Gore and Co., Aspinall Browne and Co. at Liverpool, Buckles and Co., Walker and Co., Robert Brooks, and Donaldson Wilkinson and Co. By 1833, Robert Brooks' own fleets are not as large as those of G. F. Young, the "domineering" Joseph Somes or Thomas Ward. By 1833, Brooks is friends with Joseph Dowson of London and John Gore. In 1834 Brooks is a subscriber to the new Lloyd's Register; he had an office at 80 Old Broad Street.
(Broeze, Robert Brooks, p. 61.

1833: In 1833 Brooks learns his brother-in-law Joseph Penny wants to emigrate to Australia. Dacre has teamed with William Wilks. Robert Campbell Jr. at Sydney has teamed with Thomas Williams (died 1841) at Launceston; by 1835, the former manager of the Union Bank of Australia had been Lewis Gilles, who became firm Archers Gilles and Co. at Launceston backed by the wealthy Archer brothers, prominent pastoralists. Penny becomes landed gentry in north Tasmania. In Tasmania are Cummins, Munday and Co. which had a London connection a partner. At Melbourne and Geelong is P. W. Welsh who had links with Eddie at Launceston and a City contact with John Masson; Montefiore Brothers and A. A. Gower Nephews and Sons. Gower is linked to A. B. Spark of Sydney. Welsh also deals with Duncan Dunbar's ships (in 1862 Dunbar died with a fortune of £1.5 million). At Sydney is merchant Stuart Alexander Donaldson. In June 1839 dies wife Elizabeth of James Cain; Cain became agent for Brooks at Melbourne. Duncan Dunbar's ships much beer to Australia in the 1830s. The pioneer brokers of the Australian trade in 1830s are Devitt and Moore, whom Brooks used; they load 39 ships for Australia in 1840, a peak for their business By the 1830s the WA trade is dominated by Mangles, Price and Co. and the firm's senior partner Charles Edward Mangles is on board of Union Bank of Australia.
(Broeze, Robert Brooks, pp. 76-80.

At right: Generic image of one of the fearsome Thames River Prison Hulks of the nineteenth century. A relevant book title here is Charles Campbell, The Intolerable Hulks. By an American writer.

Generic image of a Thames River prison hulk

1833: In 1833, slavery abolished in British territories. Also, East India Company monopoly on China trade abolished.

1833: First ship Fairy built for Jardine-Matheson at Liverpool. J&M send first ship Lady Hayesto Sydney, with tea cargo. (Keswick, appendices.)
1833: Before 1833, the British West Indian sugar planters fought to the last ditch to maintain slavery. There grew a (false) distinction between "free-grown and slave-grown sugar".

1833: List of shipmen and others giving information to 1833 Report of the Select Committee of the House of Commons on Manufactures, Commerce and Shipping. Parliamentary Papers, 1833, VI. H. Hughes a London wool broker. G. F. Young a prominent shipbuilder and owner. S. Browning a London merchant and wool importer (with some link to D. McLaren the manager of the South Australia Co.) Duncan Dunbar a London shipowner and merchant. W. Phillips a London ship-broker and owner. Robert Brooks shipowner and largest importer of wool from Australia. J. Gore a prominent merchant and wool importer. Also F. Parbury, C. Enderby, W. R. Coulbourn (sic).
(Broeze, Australian shipping, p. 586.

1833: First ship Fairy built for Jardine-Matheson at Liverpool. J&M send first ship Lady Hayesto Sydney, with tea cargo. (Keswick, appendices.)
1833: Before 1833, the British West Indian sugar planters fought to the last ditch to maintain slavery. There grew a (false) distinction between "free-grown and slave-grown sugar".

1833: List of shipmen and others giving information to 1833 Report of the Select Committee of the House of Commons on Manufactures, Commerce and Shipping. Parliamentary Papers, 1833, VI. H. Hughes a London wool broker. G. F. Young a prominent shipbuilder and owner. S. Browning a London merchant and wool importer (with some link to D. McLaren the manager of the South Australia Co.) Duncan Dunbar a London shipowner and merchant. W. Phillips a London ship-broker and owner. Robert Brooks shipowner and largest importer of wool from Australia. J. Gore a prominent merchant and wool importer. Also F. Parbury, C. Enderby, W. R. Coulbourn (sic).
Broeze, Australian shipping, p. 586.

F. Russel l

J. Cockburn

Re convict transport Parkfield, 496 tons, owned by J. Cockburn and Co., brokered by Lachlans and Co., Commenced 7 March 1839, 240 male convicts, sailed 15 May 1839, arrived 2 Sep 1839.

J. Cockburn: Citation: Data from the website www.theshipslist.com on the Net since 1999 by S. Swiggum and M. Kohli, file for Vessels Carrying Convicts from Great Britain, 1839-1846, A Return of all ships or Vessels hired for the conveyance of Convicts from Great Britain and Ireland, between the Ist January 1839 and the 30th June 1846, stating the Ships´ Names, Tonnage, Owner´s Name, Broker´s or Agent´s Name, Class of Ship, Rate of Freight, and when the same commenced, Number of Convicts taken on Board, when Sailed, when Sailed, Amount of Demurrage (if any), and whether engaged by Public Tender or otherwise- (in Continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 244, of Session 1839). All vessels were engaged by Public Tender. The original information for 1839-1846 came to government from James Meek, Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services. The data derives from British Parliamentary Papers (BPP), LXV, (573) (Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)

Captain Adam Cumine seems to have been son of William Cumine and Jean Moir, Jean being a daughter of William Moir and a Miss Fullerton who was sister of a Scots General in the Russian Service, General John Fullerton, died aged 77-79 unmarried, who was a relative of Robert Fullerton the sometime governor of Penang. Captain Adam Cumine in 1817 bought a house named Broadlands at Crimond, Aberdeenshire, which he renamed Rattray. (Re the Cumines of Rattray near Peterhead.)

(Pathways through the Labyrinth of Convictism)


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